Part XVI.1: Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York: Abington through Bray

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The numbers immediately following each reference below correlate with “Entry Numbers” inserted into this edition of the text, rather than to actual page numbers, as they did in the original.

  • Abingdon— Ent. 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 42, 44 — The queen appears to have been at Abingdon about the 8th October, 1502.
  • Acworth, Thomas— Ent. 10, 17, 24, 36, 57, 61, 66, 70 — Apparently one of the officers of the queen’s household, connected with the department of the stables, the expenses of which he paid.
  • Adington, Robert – Ent. 58 – A tailor.
  • Ale, for, – Ent. 48.
  • Almond butter bought, – Ent. 1 – A usual present on Good Friday, when common butter was not permitted to be eaten. In the ancient cookery temp. Richard the Second, published by the Society of Antiquaries in 1790, is this receipt for making “Botyr of Almones. Take almonde mylk and let hit boyle, and in the boyling cast therto a lytel wyne or vinegar, and when it is sothen take and cast it on a canvas abrode, tyl it be colde, then take and geder it togeder and hang it up in a cloth a lytel while, then lay it in colde water and serve it forth.” D. Paid “in rewarde for a dish of almon butter presented on Good Friday, iij s.,” occurs in the household expenses of Thomas Kyston, Esq., in 1575. — Gage’s History and Antiquities of Hengrave, p. 206.
  • Almoner, the king’s – Ent. 23. — the queen’s – Ent.18, 39, 61 – Richard Payne, clerk. – See Payne.
  • Almorys, for – Ent. 60. “Cibutum,” in Promptorium Parvulorum, in the Harl. MS 221, is translated as an “almery of mete kepyng, or a save for mete;: and Palsgrave, in Lesclarcissement de la Langue Francoys, in 1530, had “almery to put meat in, unes almoires.” It appears, however, from the this entry, that almories were applied to other purposes than for meat, as in this instance they were used for books: “and within in the said feretory on both north and south side there were ambries of fine wainscot, varnished and finely painted, and gilt over with fine little images very beautiful to behold, for the reliques belonging to St. Cuthbert lye in.” — The Ancient Rites of the Church of Durham, G.
  • Alms, money given in – Ent. 1, 3,7, 13, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27, 30, 33, 35, 39, 47, 52. The whole amount expended “in almous” was only 9 l. 11 s. 5 d, which was distributed in small sums in the queen’s progresses, in gifts to old servants of her family, or in the gratification of any sudden benevolent impulse. The practice of giving alms on journies was common with all persons of any consequence. “Delivered to my Mrs. to give by the way in her little purse.” — Gage’s History of Hengrave, p. 203.
  • Altar cloths, for working on – Ent. #50, 51. Altar cloths were frequently richly embroidered, sometimes with the name of our Saviour, sometimes with the Order of the Garter, the arms of the donor, &c. Rich robes and vestments were often bequeathed to be made into altar cloths. Royal Wills and Testamenta Vetusta.
  • Alyn, Robert, Ent. 16, 20, 23, 26, 28, 32, 42, 59 – Yeoman Usher of the queen’s chamber.
  • Anchoress, an Ent. 39, 64 – In the 18th Edw. II. a piece of ground, in St. Peter’s, Cornhill, London, which the parishioners had inclosed and built upon, is said to have been then the residence of an anchoress; and in the 4th Edw. IV. “Alice Ripas Anchoryse, inclused withyune the Chapell of St. Eleyn of Pounterfret,” was protected by the Act of Resumption in the enjoyment of 40 s., which had been granted to her by the king’s letters patent. — Rot. Parl. i. 419; v. 546{b}.
  • Antill, Ent. 25 – Ampthill, in Bedfordshire. See note in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., p. 295.
  • Anne, Lady, Ent. 5, 48, 58, 62 – The queen’s sister, who married Thomas Lord Howard, son and heir apparent of Thomas, Earl of Surrey (afterwards second Duke of Norfolk). She had issue two sons, both of whom died infants. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII., on the 4th February, 1495, is an entry of 6 s. 8 d. being paid as the king’s offering at her marriage, which nearly fixes the date of the event. See also Rolls of Parliament, vi. 479, 511.
  • Anthem, for setting an – Ent. 1.
  • Antyne, William, – Ent. 12 – A coppersmith.
  • Apothecary, John Eyrce, – Ent. 26.
  • Apothecary’s bills, – Ent. 5, 25.
  • Apples brought, – Ent. 3, 7, 17, 25, 28, 44.
  • Arbour, an, made in the Little Park at Windsor – 17 – Apparently from the price, 4 s. 8 d., an arbour was made of twigs only.
  • Arrerages, i. e. Arrears, – Ent. 70.
  • Arrows, for a sheaf of, – Ent. 32.
  • Arthur, Mr. – Ent. 63 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Arundel, Earl of, – Ent. 22 – Thomas Fitzalan, K.G. He succeeded to the earldom of Arundel in 1487, and married the queen’s aunt, Margaret, daughter of Richard Wydeville, Earl Rivers, by whom he had, among other issue, William, his son and successor, and a daughter, Margaret, who married her majesty’s first cousin, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, son of Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk, sister of Edward IV. The Earl died in 1524.
  • Askew, Christopher, -Ent. 11, 49, 66 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Attorney in the Common Pleas, – Ent. 64 – William Mordaunt. See Mordaunt. — the King’s, – Ent. 63 – James Hobert. See Hobert.
  • Auditor, the Queen’s – Ent. 63, 64 – Richard Bedell. See Bedell.
  • Aulferton, Oliver, – Ent. 58, 63 – Keeper of the Queen’s Goshawks.
  • Aurum Reginæ, – Ent. 71 – “An ancient perquisite, belonging to every queen consort during her marriage with the king, and due from every person who hath made a voluntary offering or fine to the king, amounting to ten marks or upwards, for and in consideration of any privileges, grants, licenses, pardons, or other matter of royal favour conferred upon him by the king; and it is due in proportion of one tenth part more, over and above the entire offering or fine made to the king, and becomes an actual debt of record to the queen’s majesty, by the mere recording of the fine.”In the reign of Hen. II. the manner of collecting it appears to have been well understood, and it forms a distinct head in the ancient Dialogue of the Exchequer, written in the time of that prince. From that time it was regularly claimed and enjoyed by all the queens consort of England until the death of Henry VIII.; though, after the accession of the Tudor family, the collecting of it seems to have been much neglected,” which agrees with the fact of no sum being entered under that head in these accounts. “There being no queens consort afterwards, until the accession of James I., the nature and quantity of the queen’s gold became matter of doubt, and on the subject being referred to the Judges, their report was so unfavourable to the queen’s claim, that she never exacted it.” In the llth Car. I., the king, on the petition of Queen Henrietta Maria, issued his writ for levying it; but afterwards purchased it for her for 10,000 l., “finding it, perhaps, too trifling and troublesome to levy;” and since that time no attempt has been made to collect this revenue, the value of which was nearly destroyed by the aboliltion of military tenures at the Restoration. — Blackstone’s Commentaries, i. 220, 222.
  • Awdeley, Thomas, – Ent. 6 – A mercer of London.
  • Axe, an bought, – Ent. 36.
  • Axletrees, bought – Ent. 65.

  • Bailly, Richard – Ent. 31 – Yeoman of the queen’s chamber. — Robert – Ent. 3 – One of the servants of Lord William Courtenay.
  • Baiting horses, for – Ent. 48.
  • Bangham, Lady Jane, – Ent. 61 – This person had a son, Edward Pallet, who was brought up at the queen’s expense, in the house with her Majesty’s nephews the young Lords Courtenay; but the cause of his being so favoured does not appear. In the privy purse expenses of Henry VII. are entries of a payment of 2 l. on the 10th January, 1496, to a woman of Thistleworth, for keeping of my Lady Jane Bongham’s child until Easter following; and from the entries on 1st April, 13 Hen. VII., 15 Mar., 14 Hen VII., and 1 Aug. 15 Hen. VII., it seems she was allowed 3 l. 6 s. per annum for the purpose. The following entry in those accounts on the 8th July, 1501, tends to explain the circumstance of the king’s charging himself with the expense of one of this Lady’s children: — “To Agnes Adam’s, for kepyng and berying Henry Bongham, the king’s godson, 1 l. 6 s. 8 d.” Her other son, Edmond Pallet, ws adopted by the queen.
  • Banquet, an arbour made in Windsor Park, for a banquet for the queen, – Ent. 17.
  • Baptiste, Elizabeth, – Ent. 62. — Fraunceys, – Ent. 62 – Two of the queen’s servants.
  • Barbour, Piers, – Ent. 55 – One of the servants of Henry VII. Among the extracts from the privy purse expenses ofthat monarch, in the Additional MS. 7099, in the British Museum, are entries of payments to Piers Barbor, for wine and gloves; of 8 s. paid him in January, 1503, “for one that makes the king a roll of his armes,” and of a payment by him of 9 l. 6 s. 8 d. to Mrs. Eleanor Johns, &c.
  • Barge, the Master of the, – Ent. 59 – Lewis Walter. See Walter.
  • Barehides, for mending and liquoring, – Ent. 9, 10, 20 – Barehides were hides used as coverings of packages, clothes, &c. Katherine Lady Hastngs, by her will in 1503, gave her son “three barrehides for carriage; and two barrehides for cloth sekks.” In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. p. 182, is an entry of 8 l. “for a bare hyde to cover the king’s barge;” and in the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV., p. 123, “for sowing of the barehide of the king’s car.”
  • Barge, the: notices of the queen being conveyed in her barge, and the expenses attending it, – Ent. 4, 9, 14, 34, 43, 52, 59 – Like her son, Henry VIII, and earlier sovereigns, the queen frequently moved by water from Richmond to Greenwich, and part of her suite attended her in other boats. — See a note in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII, p. 298. The whole amount spent from March, 1502 to Feb. 1503, for conveying the queen and her suite by water was 13 l. 1 s. 4 d., being about 2 l. on each occasion. The situation of master of the royal barge was one of some importance; and in the Act of Resumption 1 Henry VII., Robert Savage was protected in the grant of office of master of the king’s barge. Rot. Parl. vi. 377. In the same year “John Calcote, citizen and painter, late of Lambeth, and maister of the barge to the most Christian Prynce, King Henry VI{t}, late King of England,” obtained a reversion of his father’s attainder. Lewis Walter was the queen’s bargeman. — See Walter.
  • Barge, for tallowing and dressing the queen’s and for ropes, &c., for – Ent. 9, 49.
  • Barking, i. e., Berking in Essex, Lady of, – Ent. 2, 64.
  • Barton, Sir William, a priest for singing, and for going on a pilgrimage for the queen, – Ent. 2, 6. — Thomas, – Ent. 13 – One of the queen’s footmen.
  • Baskets, for, – Ent. 2, 6, 11, 15 – These baskets were of various kinds, some being provided with locks, and others are termed “trussing baskets,” and were used for conveying large parcels of goods.
  • Basons, for, – 11.
  • Bath, Bishop of, – Ent. 55 – Oliver King, who was translated from Exeter in November, 1495, and died in September, 1503. This prelate rebuilt the Abbey Church of Bath.
  • Baynard’s Castle, -Ent. 12,13, 14, 15, 22, 29,37, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48, 53, 54, 58 – According to Stowe, Baynard’s Castle continued to be the property of the Barons Fitz Walter until the early part of the fifteenth century, but he was not aware of the manner in which it was alienated from them. In the 7 Hen. VI. 1428, he found, he says, that after a great fire there, it was rebuilt by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, on whose attainder in 1446 it fell to the crown. It was soon afterwards awarded to Richard Duke of York, who lodged there in 1457; and in 1460 his son Edward, afterwards Edward IV., resided there when he deposed Henry. To this it may be added, that Henry VI., in 1447, granted the house which belonged to the Duke of Gloucester, with all the appurtenances in the parish of St. Andrew, within the ward of Baynard’s castle, to the provost and scholars of St. Mary’s College, Cambridge. – Rot. Parl. v. 132{b}. In 1455, “the grant was made of the place at Banardes Castell, late bildyd by oure uncle the Duke of Gloucester,” was resumed into the king’s hands. – Ibid. 309. Certain commissioners, who were appointed to administer the effects of the duke, were authorized in 1455 to take possession “of a place sometyme callid the duks warderobe atte Baynardes Castell in London, otherwise called Waterton’s alley.” — Ibid. 339{b} In the 13th Edw. IV., the College of St Mary’s was specially protected in the enjoyment of the grant of the lands of Baynard’s Castle. — Ibid. vi. 91. It was the residence of Cecily, Duchess of York, during the reign of her son Edward IV., and after his decease, Richard III. dated the first instrument on assuming the regal functions, from “a certain high chamber near the chapel in the house of Lady Cecily, Duchess of York, near the river Thames, called Baynard’s Castle in Thames-street, London.” — Fœdera, xii. 189; and, as in 1480, certain articles of Edward’s robes were carried thither from Greenwich, it may be inferred that he then visited his mother. In 1487, Stow says, that Henry repaired, or rather new built, the house in a beautiful manner, and mentions many occasions on which Henry resided there. These entries relate chiefly to repairs to Baynard’s castle and to the removal of furniture to and from it; but we learn from them that the queen passed several days there, about the 19th November, 1502; and she seems to have stopped there for a short time previously to going to the Tower in December following. Five shillings are stated to have been spent for making an arbour at Baynard’s Castle in the 18th Hen. VII. — Additional MS. 7099.
  • Beale, mad, – Ent. 66 – This entry is so imperfect, that it can only be suggested that the sons of a deranged person of the name of Beale were charitably supported by the queen.
  • Beasts, for painting, – Ent. 20 – It is possible these drawings of beasts wre intended as designs for tapestry, G. See Painting.
  • Bed, for working on a rich, – Ent. 50 – Ample evidence exists of the extraordinary richness and value of beds in the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries. Every kind of ornament, arms, flowers, devices, scriptural subjects, animals, &c., was embroidered on them, and they sometimes had particular names, and were not unfrequently strictly entailed on the possessor’s heirs. The bed here alluded to must, from its being described as “the rich bed,” have been one of unusual splendour; and three men and three women were employed on it from fourteen to fifty-two days each.

    “A bedde he had ryght well ydyght
    With ryche clothus of ryght gode aray.”
    Legend of St. Ede of Wilton, stanza 296

  • Bed of Tourney – Ent. 22 – See Tourney.
  • Bedelle, Richard, – Ent. 63, 64 – The queen’s auditor.
  • Bedford, fee farm of the town of, – Ent. 70.
  • Beds, page of the queen’s, -Ent. 3, 6 – groom of the, – Ent. 6 – wardrobe of the, – Ent. 9 – yeoman of the, – Ent. 27, 49.
  • Bedstead, for making a, – Ent. 27.
  • Bedmaker, a, – Ent. 38.
  • Beer, given to friars in charity, – Ent. 30, 32.
  • Belknap, Mrs. Margaret, – Ent. 7, 21, 28, 62 – One of the ladies in attendance on the queen’s person. Query, if she was the Margaret Belknap, daughter of Sir Richard Knollys, and widow of Henry Belknap, Esq., who died in 1488, and by whom she had Sir Edward Belknap, a privy councillor to Henry VII. and Henry VIII.? She was living in 1488, after which nothing has been discovered about her.
  • Bell, John, his child christened, – Ent. 16 – The queen was, most probably, one of the sponsors.
  • Bellows, a pair of, bought, – Ent. 11.
  • Belly, John, – Ent. 24 – Yeoman of the Queen’s Stuff.
  • Berkeley, – Ent. 23, 24, 26, 34, 35 – The queen seems to have been at Berkeley from the 29th August to the 14th September, 1502. — herons 37, 39 – Query, Berkeley Harness, or Demesnes?
  • Berkhampstead in Hertfordshire, the under keeper of, – Ent. 17.
  • Beverston, – Ent. 26, 34 – In the hundred of Berkeley, in the county of Gloucester. A small castle rebuilt by the Thomas Lord Berkeley who is mentioned by Froissart. See Leland’s Itinerary, vol. vi. p. 68. “T. Lorde Berkeley was taken prisoner in France: but after recovering his losses with French prisoners at the battle of Poyteres builded the castell of Beverston thoroughly.” D.
  • Birche, Sir Robert, priest, for singing – Ent. 64.
  • Birds brought, – Ent. 29.
  • Bits bought, – Ent. 61.
  • Bishop of the King’s Chapel on St. Nicholas’ Even, – Ent. 46 – “A gift to the Boy-Bishop for saying Vespers in the King’s Chapel on St. Nicholas eve. In the Wardrobe Account of the 28th Edw. I., published by the Society of Antiquaries , fo. 25, is a similar item: “7{o} die Decembris, cuidem episcopo puerorum dicenti vesperis de Sancto Nichalao coram Rege in capella sua apud Heton juxta Novum Castrum super Tynam, et quibusdam pueris venientibus et cantantibus cum espiscopo predicto de elemosina ipsius Regis per manus Domini Henrici Elemosinar’ participantis inter pueros predictos xls.” The History of the Boy-Bishop is too well known to require observation. G. In the extracts from the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. in 1512, in the Additional MS.,7100, is this entry on the 5th December (St. Nicholas’ Day), “To St. Nicholas, bishop, in reward, 6 l. 13 s. 4 d.
  • Bishops, new year’s gifts of the, – Ent. 55, 56.
  • Blades for knives, – Ent. 59.
  • Blake, William, – Ent. 70 – This person bought the wardship and marriage of John Carew, the son and heir of Sir John Carew, Knt., for which he paid 25 l.
  • Blakemore – Ent. 24, 39 – In the hundred of Westbury, in the county of Gloucester.
  • Boat-hire, – Ent. 3, 4, 7, 15, 19, 40, 60, 61 – The usual wges of each rower was 8 d. the day, whilst the master of the queen’s barge received double that sum: the hire of a boat from Greenwich to London was 4 d.We find that 2 s. 4 d. were paid for boat hire from Richmond to Greenwich; 1 s. from Richmond to London; 3 d. from Westminster to London; and that for rowing from Baynard’s Castle to Westminster, the rowers were paid 4 d. each, whilst the master of the barge received a whole day’s wages, viz. 16 d. The master of the other boats received always double what the rowers were paid. The price of a boat from Gravesend to the Tower and back was, it seems, 3 s. 4 d. As the rowers were paid so much each for their services, the sums paid “in reward” for boats, probably meant for the hire of them above and below London Bridge. “The hire of a barge with vj men and the master” going therein to court on May-day, 1575, was ix s., “and for ij botes in coming up with the men ij s. viij d., and in reward amongst the bargemen xij d.” – Gage’s History of Hengrave.
  • Bolok, John, – Ent. 50 – An embroiderer.
  • Bolton, John, – Ent. 24 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Bolts, for, – Ent. 12.
  • Boards, for – Ent. 44.
  • Bone, Mrs. Margaret, – Ent. 62 – One of the queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Bonfires,, for making, on the Eves of St. John the Baptist and St. Peter, – Ent. 15 – Strutt observes, “on the vigil of Saint John the Baptist, commonly called Midsummer eve, it was usual in most country places, and also in towns and cities, for the inhabitants, both old and young , and of both sexes, to meet together, and make merry, by the side of a large fire, in the middle of the street, or in some open and convenient place, over which the young men frequently leaped, by way of frolic, and also exercised themselves with various sports and pastimes, more especially with running, wrestling, and dancing. These diversion they continued till midnight, and sometime till cock-crowing.” “At London,” says Stowe, “in addition to the bonfires on the eve of St. John, as well upon that of St. Peter and St. Paul, every man’s door was shaded with green birch, long fennel, St. John’s wort, orpin, white lilies, and the like, ornamented with garlands of beautiful flowers. The citizens had also lamps of glass, with oil burning in them all night, and some of them hung out branches of iron, curiously wrought, containing hundreds of lamps, lighted at once, which made a very splendid appearance.” — Stowe’s Survey: Sports and Pastimes, 316, 317. See Gage’s History of Hengrave, for further illustration of the pastime called Midsummer Watch, when it was customary to enter the houses of individuals in the city to examine the state of their arms.
  • Bonnets, for – Ent. 57, 61, 66 – Bonnets, as shewn by Strutt, were used as well by men as by women. They wre commonly made of cloth, and were sometimes ornamented with jewels, feathers, gold buttons, &c. Thus we find bonnets bought for the use of the queen and for the use of her nephew, Lord Henry Courtenay; and in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. bonnets are mentioned, as being bought for his majesty, p. 15. See also Bonnets in the Index to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV. In a curious letter from Edward IV. when Earl of March, and his brother, the Earl of Rutland, to their father, after thanking his “noblesse and good fadurhood” for the green gowns he had sent them, they request him that they might have “summe fyne bonetts sende un to us by the next seure messigere, for necessite so requireth.” — Ellis’sOriginal Letters, First Series, I. 10. — night, a, – Ent. 10 — for fetching – Ent. 8.
  • Bonvice, Jerome, – Ent. 67 – A Laurance Bonvice is mentioned in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII., as having received 2068 l. 4 s. 11 d. on the 26th May, 9 Hen. VII., “to employ for the king, which must be repayed:” and on the 1st June following, 1340 l. ll s. l d. to buy wools for the king’s use.
  • Books, bought, – Ent. 61, 66 — for making a chest to put books in, in the Queen’s Council Chamber, – Ent. 60.
  • Bostall, – Ent. 22 – In the hundred of Ashenden, in the county of Bucks. An interesting account of an ancient house at Borstall will be found in Kennet’s Parochial Antiquities.
  • Botery, William, – Ent. 5, 39 – A mercer of London.
  • Bourne, Mrs. – Ent. 21, 27 – One of the queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Bowl, a – Ent. 2 — a washing, for the Queen of Scots, – Ent. 11.
  • Bow, the queen’s offering at, – Ent. 12.
  • Bradow, Beatrix, – Ent. 62 – Rocker to Lord Henry Courtenay. See Rocker.
  • Braggs, Emma, – Ent. 62 – Rocker to Lady Margaret Courtenay.
  • Brampton, Richard, – Ent. 59 – Gentleman of the queen’s pantry. By the description “yeoman of the king’s pantry,” he and Thomas Fysh, serjeant of the pantry, were protected in the enjoyment of the office of keepers of the manor, park, gardens, and warren of Shene; and Brampton was also protected in the enjoyment of the office of keeper of the park of Rowndhagh, in Yorkshire, by the Resumption, 1 Hen. VII., 1485.Rot. Parl. vi. 381{a & b}.
  • Brawderers. See Embroiderers.
  • Bray, – Ent. 67 – See Cokeham.
  • Bray, Lady, – Ent. 6, 11, 12, 13, 16, 27, 28, 29, 32, 39 – Probably Katherine, daughter of Nicholas Hussey, esq., and widow of Sir Reginald Bray, K.G., and Knight Banneret. She made her will on the 15th of December, 1507, in which she ordered her body to be buried in the College of Windsor, near her husband, and died before the 7th of February following, without issue. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII.,in March, 1495, is an entry of l l. 6 s. 8 d. being paid her for an image; in the next year 1 l. 2 s. for stools and skrenes; and in Sept. 1498 of 20 s. for the queen’s minstrels.