Part XVI.4: Index and Notes for Privy Purse Expenses Easthampstead through Hynsted

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  • Easthampstead, – Ent. 27, 28, 32, 33, 42, 43 – In Berkshire. The Queen arrived there on the 11th October, 1502, and remained some days.
  • Eching hoops of the wheels of the car, for, – Ent. 19 – “To Eche” is to add to or increase. Thus Chaucer —

    “Delitith nought in wo they who to seche
    As doen these folis that ther sorowes eche
    With sorowe, whan they had misavinture.”
    Troilus and Creseide, i. 705.

    It was also used synonymously with to lengthen. “For echyng of a veil 10 elnes of lynen cloth.” Churchwardens’ Accounts of St. Mary’s Hill, London, temp. Hen. VII., printed in Nichols’ Illustrations of Ancient Times, p. 98.

  • Edward, Lord. Son of Lord William Courtenay by Katherine the Queen’s sister. See Courtenay.
  • Edward IV., King, servants of, – Ent. 13, 17, 39, 46.
  • Edward, Prince, offering to, – Ent. 2 – Query, if to the shrine of Edward, Prince of Wales, son of Henry the Sixth.
  • Eggs, for – Ent. 8, 31.
  • Eldreton, Thomas, – Ent. 65 – Apparently one of the Queen’s servants.
  • Elnestow, in Bedfordshire, Abbess of, – Ent. 20, 25.
  • Ely, Bishop of, – Ent. 55 – Richard Redman, who was translated from Exeter in September, 1501, and died 26th August, 1505.
  • Elyot, Richard, the Queen’s Attorney, – Ent. 63 – According to Dugdale’s Origines, he was made a Sergeant at Law in Michaelmas Term, 1505; but he is described with that title on the Rolls of Parliament two years before, namely, in the 19th Hen. VII., 1503, as a Commissioner for Wiltshire in the collection of the aid for Knighting the Prince. Eliot was made a Judge of the Common Pleas in April, 1514, and died in 1529.
  • Elys, Roger, – Ent. 53 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Embroiderer, to the Queen’s, – Ent. 8, 30, 50, 53 – He was allowed 16 d. a week for his board wages and 2 l. a year for his house-rent.
  • Empson, Richard, – Ent. 63 – The celebrated instrument of Henry the Seventh’s extortions.
  • Esterfeld, Mr., of Bristol, – Ent. 23 – John Esterfeld was one of the Commissioners of Bristol for collecting the subsidy, in the 12th Hen. VII., 1496. — Rot. Parl., vi. 518. He was sheriff of Bristol in 1482 and in May, 1484. Evan’s Annals of Bristol. A person of the same name represented Bristol in parliament in 1595 and the 1597, and was mayor of that city in 1594.
  • Essex, receipt of the Queen’s revenues for the county of, – Ent. 70.
  • Eton, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Estate, a Cloth of, – Ent. 38 – This entry minutely describes a “Cloth of Estate,” or the canopy under which persons of high rank generally sat.
  • Ewelm, – Ent. 27, 33, 42 – In Oxfordshire. The Queen was there on the 13th October, 1502. This manor belonged to William de la Pole, Earl, Marquess, and Duke of Suffolk, in consequence of his marriage with Alice, daughter and heiress of Sir Thomas Chaucer, son of the Poet, and was forfeited by the Duke’s attainder in 1450. It was, however, restored to his grandson and heir, Edmond de la Pole (son and heir of John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, by Elizabeth, sister of King Edward the Fourth), in 1495.
  • Ewry, office of the, – Ent. 48, 55 – The office of the Royal Household in which the Ewers or basons, &c., for washing the hands before and after meals were kept. A full account of this office, which still exists, and the duty of the persons attached to it, will be found in the Liber Niger Domus Regis, Edw. IV., p. 83, printed by the Society of Antiquaries, in the “Collection of Ordinances and Regulations for the Government of the Royal Household,” in 1790. Mr. Sharon Turner has misunderstood what was meant by “the Ewry” in his History of the reign of Richard the Third, as he speaks of Richard’s having “a palace in London, called the Ewer.”
  • Exeter, Bishop of, – Ent. 55 – John Arundel, who was translated from Litchfield and Coventry, on the 29th June, 1502, and died 15th March, 1504.

  • Faggots, for, – Ent. 48.
  • Fairford, – Ent. 24, 25, 26, 34, 39 – In Gloucestershire. It appears that the Queen was there in September, 1502.
  • Fairfax, Robert, – Ent. 1 – Robert Fairfax, upon which name Fuller observes “a pulchro capillitio, from the fair hair, either bright in colour, or comely for the plenty therof; their motto, in allusion to their name Fare, fac (say so) — such the sympathy it seems between their tongues and hearts, was of the Yorkshire family of that name, was a Doctor in Music at Cambridge, and was incorporated of Oxford in the year 1511.” He was an eminent English Composer during the reigns of Henry the Seventh and Henry the Eighth. Bishop Tanner says, he was of Bayford, in the County of Hertford, and that he died at St. Albans, which Hawkins observes, “is very probable, for he was either organist or chanter of the Abbey church there, and lies buried therein.” His arms were affixed over the place of his interment, but have long been hid by the seat of the Mayor of that town. His curious collection of MSS. by himself and other Composers, were in the possession of General Fairfax, upon whose demise they formed part of the Thoresby Collection. — See Bliss’s Wood’s Fasti Oxonienses, i. 34.
  • Fastern, – Ent. 23, 25, 60. – Park, – Ent. 53 – In Wiltshire. The park and pasture of Fastern were part of the Queen’s jointure. — Rot. Parl. vi. 462.
  • Fawn, brought a, – Ent. 10.
  • Feckenham, Reveiver of the Lordship of, – Ent. 70.
  • Fee Farms, – Ent. 70 – “A fee farm rent is a rent charge issuing out of an estate in fee, of at least one-fourth of the value of the lands, at the time of its reservation: for a grant of lands reserving so considerable a rent is, indeed, only letting lands to farm in fee-simple, instead of the usual methods for life or years.” — Blackstone’s Commentaries ii. 43.
  • Feld, John, – Ent. 16, 20, 22, 23, 33, 34, 53 – Groom of the Queen’s chamber. His wages were six-pence a day.
  • Fent of gowns, – Ent. 54 – “Fente of a gowne — fente.” — Palsgrave’s Esclarissement de la langue Francoyse. This word is translated by cleft, rift, slit, &c., by Cotgrave. “Fente d’une chemise” is the bosom, and as this entry relates to fur for the collar and fent of a gown, it probably menat the part over the bosom.
  • Fines, money received for, – Ent. 70.
  • Firing, for, – Ent. 24, 56.
  • Fishe, Thomas, – Ent. 17.
  • Fitzherbert, Mrs. Elizabeth, – Ent. – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen. Perhaps this lady was sister of Sir Anthony Ftiz Herbert, one of the Justices of the Common Pleas in the next reign, and eldest daughter of Ralph Fitz Herbert, of Norbury, by Elizabeth Marshal, his first wife. — G.
  • Fitz Williams, John – Ent. 5 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Flannel, for, – Ent. 58.
  • Flemming, Anne, Called the great, a gown given to, – Ent. 41- Perhaps the person who is thus mentioned in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, in August, 1503 — “To the long Fleming for a horse.” —Add. MS. 7099.
  • Flexley Abbey, – Ent. 23, 24, –—- for offerings to the high altar at, – Ent. 21 – Flaxley, near Newnham, in Gloucestershire. This place was visited in August, 1502, by the Queen during her progress into Wales.
  • Flowers, for, – Ent. 2.
  • Fool, William, the Queen’s, for his board, clothes, and expenses, whilst sick, – Ent. 3, 14, 15, 35 – —– the Lord Privy Seal’s, 56 – —– my Lord of York’s, – Ent. 1 – The fool of Henry, Duke of York, afterwards King Henry the Eighth. These entries afford little information on the subject of Fools, which has been ably discussed by Mr. Douce, in his Illustrations of Shakespeare (See a note in the Privy Purse Expneses of Henry VIII. p. 319); but they corroborate the fact that a fool always formed part of the establishments of persons of distinction. The following entries relative to “Fools,” in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, and in those of the 1st of Henry the Eighth, may be acceptable. “To Thomas Blackall, the King’s fool, 6 s. 8 d.” “To Patch the fool in reward.” “To the foolyshe Duke of Lancastre.” “To the Lord Privy Seal’s fool.” “For a horse, saddle, and bridle, for Dego, the Spanish fool, 18 s. 6 d.” “For Duk the fool’s raiment.” “To the King of France’s fool in reward, 4 l.” “To the King of Castile’s fool.” — Add. MS. 7099, 7010. Of these fools, the Lord Privy Seal’s and Patch are the only ones notices in the Queen’s Privy Purse Expenses. It is not a little remarkable that Henry the Seventh should have allowed a fool to be nicknamed the “Duke of Lancaster,” as it was his greatest pride to elevate the house of Lancaster in the estimation of the world. In the Churchwardens’ Accounts of St. Margaret’s, Westminster, in 1485, is the following entry: “Item at the burying of Mr. John, the Queen’s foole;” and in the list of New Year’s gifts in 1556, was “geven by the Quein’s Maiestie the 5th of December to a woman dwelling at Bury, for healing Jane the foole her eye, oon guilt salte with a cover,” weighing 10 oz. 3 qr.; and “to Mr. Ayer, for kepinge the saide Jane during the tyme of the healing of her eye two guilt salts with a cover, 18 oz. di.” — Nichols’s Illustrations of Ancient Times,” pp. 3, 27, 28.
  • Footmen, the Queen’s, for bonnets, shirts, and other clothes for, – Ent. 24, 41, 45, 49, 58, 60 – —– to the, for their drying money, – Ent. 49 – See Drying.
  • Fotheringhay, – Ent. 8, 71.
  • Fowler, William, – Ent. 49 – A Dyer of London.
  • Fox, fur of, – Ent. 10.
  • Fustian, for, – Ent. 9,21, 43.
  • Franches, i.e. franchises, – Ent. 67.
  • Fraunceys, for his expenses, – Ent. 27.
  • Frese, for, – Ent. 24 – Coarse Cloth. See note in the “Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII.” p. 321.
  • Friars Observant of Greenwich, – Ent. 30 – —– of Canterbury, – Ent. 32.
  • Fringes for curtains, – Ent. 38.
  • Frontlets, for, – Ent. 57 – —– gold, for fetching the Queen’s, – Ent. 40 – A frontlet is described by Nares as a forehead- band, worn to make the forehead smooth. Among the effects of Henry the Eighth in the list in the Harleian MS., 1419, are “Frontlets of crimson satten, embraudered with perles.” — Strutt’s Horda, iii. 80. And in the Regualtions made by Margaret, Countess of Richmond, for the mourning of women of rank in 1492, Countesses and Duchesses were allowed “one barbe, one frontelett, and two or four kerchiefs.” — Strutt’s Dresses and Habits, ii. 325. An entry of “four old frontletts of dyvers colours of velvet,” occurs in the Churchwardens’ Accounts of St. Mary Hill, London, in 1524, printed in Nichols’s Illustrations of Ancient Times, p. 125. Though, as it seems, generally made of cloth, silk, or velvet, as in Entry 57, where, together with bonnets, &c., they formed part of a silk-woman’s bill, it is evident from Ent. 40, that they were also made of gold. By statute 17 Edw. IV., the wives, and daughters unmarried, of persons having possessions of the yearly value of 10 l. and upwards, were permitted to “use and wear frontlettes of blak velvet, or of any other cloth of silk of the colour blak.” — Rot. Parl., vi. 189. Among the entries in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, is a payment in 1492, of 3 l. 13 s. 4 d. “To the Queen’s grace for frontlets” — and another occasion, of exactly the same sum for “frontlets of gold.” — Add. MS., 7099. In the Privy Purse Expenses of the Princess, afterwards Queen, Mary, is “Payed for a frountlet loste in a wager to my Lady Margaret, iiij li. which must, from the price, have been of gold.
  • Fruit, brought, – Ent. 57.
  • Frye, Sir John, a Priest who farmed, i.e. rented lands at Worthy Mortimer, to let again, – Ent. 69.
  • Fuller, Thomas, Mercer of London, – Ent. 13, 15.
  • Fur, of fox, – Ent. 10.
  • Furness, Abbot of, – Ent. 70.
  • Furring of gowns, – Ent. 54 – The use of Furs was confined to persons of rank by various legislative provisions. See Rolls of Parliament, ii. 278, 279, 281, 282; iii. 63; v. 505; vi. 221; and Strutt’s Dresses.
  • Fustian, – Ent. 66.
  • Fyll, the King’s Painter, – Ent. 20 – In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, in April, 1503, his name is thus mentioned — “To Thomas Stirr, for painting two Tabernacles, 6 l.” “To Robert Fylle, for making of the same, 8 l.” — See Painting and Reynolds.

  • Garter, for lace and buttons for the King’s mantle, of the Order of the, – Ent. 5.
  • Gear, for a kirtle, and other, – Ent. 29 – This word was used with the greatest latitude to indicate similar articles to any one which might be the last spoken of. See a note in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII.,in 1532, p. 323.
  • Gentleman, William, – Ent. 23, 31, 54 – Page of the Queen’s chamber.
  • Gentlewomen, for the conveyance of the Queen’s. – See Barge.
  • Gentyll, James, Mercer of London, – Ent. 13, 34 – In the 19th Hen. VII., after the Queen’s death, he was paid 30 l. for the Queen’s debt by the King.
  • Girdle, to a Monk that brought Our Lady’s, – Ent. 47 – Probably one of the numerous Relicks with which the monasteries and abbies then abounded, and which might have been brought to the Queen for her to put on when in labour, as it was a common practice for women in that situation to wear blessed girdles. In a curious MS. of the fifteenth century, in the possession of the Rev. James Dallaway, entitled, “The Knowyng of Woman Kynde,” one recipe in difficult cases is, “to wryte the salme of the Magnificath in a longe scrow and gyrdit abowte her, and sche shall be delyvert.” Charms applied to particular parts of the body, under such circumstances, are perhaps not yet obsolete. See Brand’s Popular Antiquities.
  • Girdle, materials for, – Ent. 5, 27 – —– harnesses for, – Ent. 51 – Numerous notices relative to the use of girdles occur on the Rolls of Parliament. See Rot. Parl. vi. 278, 279, 281 282; iii. 296, 506, 542, 593; and iv. 73. By statute 3 Edw IV., no person was permitted to wear a girdle harnessed with gold or silver in any part over gilt, who had not yearly possessions of the value of 40 l.; but the wives of Squires of the Household, Yeoman of the Crown, and Squires and Gentlemen, and of Mayors, Alderman, and Bailiffs, might wear gilt girdles and kerchiefs, of the price of a plyte of 5 s., v. 505.
  • Glasbury, Henry, – Ent. 56 – —– wife of, – Ent. 60.
  • Gloucester, city of, – Ent. 24 – —– to an Anchoress at, – Ent. 39 – —– Receipt of the Queen’s revenues from the county of, – Ent. 70.
  • Gold, flat and round, – Ent. 30 – The latter was eight-pence and ounce dearer than the former. —– of Venice, – Ent. 5, 13, 16. —– Damask, i.e. Damascus gold.
  • Goldsmiths, to– Ent. 37, 57, 61.
  • Goodman, Thomas, – Ent. 64.
  • Goodriche, Thomas, – Ent. 6, 37 – A mercer of London.
  • Goose, John, – Ent. 1 – The Duke of York’s Fool, a name probably bestowed on him from his situation.
  • Goshawks, brought, – Ent. 23, 53 – —– Keeper of the Queen’s, – Ent. 58, 63.
  • Gough, Margaret, – Ent. 64 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Gowns, for, – Ent. 9, 10, 13, 14, 19, 22, 40, 41, 66 – —– various, described, – Ent. 40.
  • Gowns, materials for making, – Ent. 5 – —– for mending, 4, 58 – —– for furring and the cuffs of, – Ent. 54 – —– wedding, – Ent. 26 – —– for the carriage of the Queen’s, – Ent. 10 – —– for fetching divers, – Ent. 19, 40 – An elaborate account of the gowns worn at this and earlier periods, will be found in Strutt’s Dresses and Habits. Henry the Seventh gave the Queen in 1500, 20 l. “to buy gold of Venice for to make a gown.” — Add. MS. 7099.
  • Grantham, to the brotherhood of Jesus Guild, in, – Ent. 27.
  • Grace, the Rood of, in Kent, – Ent. 2.
  • Grapes, brought, – Ent. 28.
  • Grayling of tappetts for the sumpter horse, – Ent. 8 – Tapets, cut or rounded, like the partition line called in Heraldry engrailed. Instances occur in these accounts of the use of terms in the notices of dress, furniture, &c. which are now confined to Heraldry, as Chevrons, Pales, &c. Chaucer’s Personnes Tale presents several examples of the kind, “as to the first sinne, in superfluitee of clothing, whiche that maketh it so dere to the harme of the peple not only the cost of the enbrouding, the disguising, endenting or barring, ounding, paling, winding or bending.” The word engrailed is thus used in the list of articles delivered for the coronation of Richard the Third — “rede cloth engreyled with vj yerdes of white woolen cloth.” — Antiquarian Report. Ed. 1807, vol. i. p. 50.
  • Gravesend, – Ent. 60.
  • Grease, bought, – Ent. 20.
  • Greenway, William, wife of, – Ent. 9.
  • Greenwich, – Ent. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20, 23, 42, 44, 53, 54, 57, 69 – Her Majesty was at Greenwich on the 6th, 10th, 27th April; 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 18th May; and on the 14th November, 1502.
  • Greenwich, Friars Observants of, – Ent. 30.
  • Grey, Dame Katherine, – Ent. 36 – Apparently one of the queen’s ladies. She was probably the Lady Grey in whose chamber a man was slain; but it is difficult to identify her. See Burials. – —– Nicholas, – Ent. 4, 11 – Clerk of the Works at Richmond.
  • Greyhounds, the expense of the Queen’s, – Ent. 18, 33, 54 – The keeper of these dogs was allowed 2 d. a day for their support.
  • Grice, John, apothecary, – Ent. 5, 15, 25, 26.
  • Griffiths, —– – Ent. 61 – It seems that this person had been Yeoman of the Queen’s Chamber; and that he retired to the monastery of St. Margaret’s, Westminster. The expenses of his entering there, as well as of his funeral, were defrayed by the Queen; whence it may be inferred that he was a favourite Servant.
  • Grigg, Sir John,48.
  • Grooms and Pages of the Queen’s Chamber, to, in reward, – Ent. 47.
  • Guard, to the King’s, in reward, – Ent. 21.
  • Guides, to,18, 24, 25, 60.
  • Guildford, Lady Jane, 27, 62 – One of the ladies attached to the Queen’s person, and apparently Jane, the second wife of Sir Richard Guildford, K.G., and sister of Nicholas Lord Vaux. It is probable that it was this lady who accompanied the Princess Mary, sister of Henry the Eighth, to France, on her marriage with Louis the Twelfth, in 1514, as mistress of her maids of honour, whose uncermonious dismissal, together with all the bride’s other English attendants, by Louis, the morning after his nuptials, is the subject of complaint from Mary to Henry and Cardinal Wolsey, in two letters printed in Ellis’s Original Letters, First Series, i., 115-119. The young queen calls her “my mother Guildford,” and says she has not yet seen “yn Fraunce eny lady or gentill woman, so necessary for me as sche ys, nor zet so mete to do the kynge my brother service as sche is;” and begs she may be immediately sent back to her — “for,” she adds, “I had as lefe lose the wynnynge I schalle have yn France, as to lose her counsell when I shall lacke yt.” In a letter from the Earl of Worcester to Wolsey, also printed in Mr. Ellis’s Letters, his Lordship acknowledges the Cardinal’s letter, acquainting him with Henry’s pleasure “touching the retorne of my Lady Guildford:” he then explains Louis’s reasons for dismissing his wife’s English retinue, and states, that his Majesty persisted in refusing to allow them to return. — Original Letters, Second Series, i. 244. This lady, in the 6th Henry VIII., had a grant of an annuity of 20 l. for her services to the king, to his father, his mother, and his sisters the Queens of France and Scotland. The Guildford family were peculiar favourites of both Henry the Seventh and Henry the Eighth. The husband, and Sir Henry the son, of the lady here noticed, were honoured with the Garter; and the latter, at whose marriage on 25th April, 1512, both Henry the Eighth and the Princess of Castile offered, was Comptroller of the Household, &c., to the latter Monarch. In January, 1510, Sir Thomas Brandon, uncle of Charles Duke of Suffolk, bequeathed to “Lady Jane Gylford, widow,” his place in Southward, with his lease, which he had of the Bishop of Winchester, together with all his purchased lands in Norfolk and Suffolk, for life, she to pay his nephew William Sydney, 20 marks a year, with remainder to his nephew Charles (afterwards Duke of Suffolk), and his heirs. A notice will be found of the Guildford family in Collin’s Baronetage, col. v. p. 1.
  • Gurden, Lady, – Ent. 29 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen.

  • Hales, to the Holy Blood of, – Ent. 2 – “A pretended relick of the blood of our Saviour, which was brought from the Holy Land, and deposited in the Cistercian Monastery of Hayles in Gloucestershire, by Edmund Earl of Cornwall. See Collier’s Ecclesiastical History, i. 14; and Petri Benedicti Vita et Gest. Hen. II. &c. ii. 752.” — Northumberland Household Book, p. 438.
  • Hales, Owen, fee farm of, – Ent. 70.
  • Hall, to the grooms and pages of the, for making bonfires, – Ent. 15.
  • Hallysworth, Dr., – Ent. 60 – A physician who was sent for to attend the Queen in her last illness.
  • Ham, near Richmond in Surrey, – Ent. 48.
  • Hamerton, John, 12, 23, 32 – One of the Queen’s servants, but the situation he held does not appear. —– George, – Ent. 10, 19, 23, 26, 32, 42, 44, 56, 59 – Groom porter. His wages were 10 d. a day. —– William, – Ent. 20, 26, 27, 32, 49, 56, 57 – Yeoman of the wardrobe of the Queen’s beds. His wages were 1 s. a day.
  • Hamond, Maud, – Ent. 7, 36 – A woman who had given her child to the Queen, at whose expense it was nursed. See Children.
  • Hamper, for, a, – Ent. 22.
  • Hampton Court, – Ent. 1, 4, 7, 58, 59.
  • Hanged, for burying men who were, – Ent. 8 – See Burying.
  • Harbegiers, to the King’s, – Ent. 21 – Harbingers. Persons whose duty it was to provide lodgings for the king, or persons connected with the Court, when on a jounrey. In an unpublished letter, in the Hengrave collection, dated 26th July, 1560, addressed to the Countess of Bath, from her steward, the following passage occurs. — “Yo{r} L. shall understand that I have been mych adoo, in staying yo{r} house for to be takyn up by the Harbyngers for the French imbassadors which comyth for the confirmacon of the pease. They thretenyd to breke upe all the locks in the house, but I w{th}stood them as far as reason wolde, and was before the counsell byfore we were at stay, but I trust yo{r} house is now saff enough from ther takyng.” — G. (See Herbegage.)
  • Harcourt, Mrs., – Ent. 36 – It was intended that this person should have been the Queen’s nurse in her last and fatal confinement.
  • Harding, Mr., – Ent. 26 – Clerk of the Queen’s Closet; probably a priest.
  • Hardy, Sir John, – Ent. 14.
  • Harness, horse, for a, – Ent. 10.
  • Harnesses, for girdles, – Ent. 51 – See Girdles.
  • Hart, a, brought, – Ent. 27.
  • Harveys, Richard, – Ent. 70 – Receiver of the Lordship of Feckenham.
  • Hawte, Jaques, – Ent. 21, 49 – One of the Queen’s servants. The Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh state, that he was Under Keeper of Kenelworth.
  • Hawks, for meat for the, – Ent. 58.
  • Havering at Bower, – Ent. 7, 18, 36, 48.
  • Hayward, John, – Ent. 54 – A skinner.
  • Hed, Robert, – Ent. 12 – A taylor of London.
  • Henchmen to the king, – Ent. 55 – Pages of Honour. They were sons of gentlemen, and in public processions walked by the side of the monarch’s horse. See a note on this word in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., 1532, p. 327.
  • Henley upon Thames, – Ent. 33, 42.
  • Henley, John, – Ent. 57 – A sadler of London.
  • Henry, King, offerings made to, – Ent. 2, 16 – Henry the Sixth, who, from his exemplary piety,enjoyed the honours of canonization. His shrine was at Eton.
  • Hensted, John, – Ent. 10 – A tradesman.
  • Heralds of Arms, gifts to, on New Year’s Day, – Ent. 55.
  • Herauld, – Ent. 25 – Harrold, in Bedfordshire, about eight miles from Bedford.
  • Herbegage, – Ent. 44 – Preparing lodgings and making other arrangements for the Queen’s reception at the places through which she passed. See Harbegiers.
  • Herbert, Sir Walter, – Ent. 23, 27; his wife, – Ent. 27 – Apparently Sir Walter Herbert, younger son of William first Earl of Pembroke. He was retained to serve the king beyond the sea for one year with a large retinue in 1492 (Fœdera, xii.480), and was specially protected in the office of Steward of the Lordships of Uske, Carlion, and Treyleck, “with the making of the crouner and officers to the said office” appertaining, by the Act of Resumption, 1 Hen. VII. — Rot. Parl. vi. 379. His wife was Ann, daughter of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, but he died S.P.
  • Hercules, Friar, – Ent. 5 – In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, in May, 1503, is an entry of 6 l. 13 s. 4 d. “to Friar Hercules, for a Psalter.”
  • Herman, John, Sergeant of the Queen’s Car, – Ent. 66.
  • Hermit, to a, at Colnbrooke, – Ent. 18.
  • Heron, John, – Ent. 46.
  • Hertley, John, – Ent. 9, 10 – A tradesman.
  • Hichin, Prior of, – Ent. 7.
  • Higham, Stephen, – Ent. 8 – A tradesman.
  • Hiltone, Elys, – Ent. 10, 12, 29 – Groom of the robes.
  • Hinges, for mending, – Ent. 12.
  • Hobart, James, the King’s Attorney, – Ent. 63 – Attorney- general and privy councillor to Henry the Seventh, and ancestor of the Earls of Buckinghamshire; he died whilst attorney-general, in 1507.
  • Holden, Thomas, – Ent. 22, 27, 33, 42 – A yeoman of the queen’s household, but in what department does not appear. He was probably the Thomas Holden, mentioned in Ent. 22, as having given his child to the queen.
  • Holand, John, – Ent. 63, 67 – Keeper of the Council Chamber.
  • Holburn, Abbot of, – Ent. 28.
  • Horse-hire, for, – Ent. 32, 33, 54, 60 – The hire of a horse for carrying venison was, on one occasion, 4 d., and on another 6 d. the day; whilst the hire of one to convey a lady from Esthampstead to London, was 16 d.
  • Horse, the Sompter, – Ent. 8 – The sumpter horse was a horse that carried clothes or furniture; a baggage horse.
  • Horses, towards the purchase of, – Ent. 12, 28 – Six shillings and eight-pence was the sum given in each instance to the same person, who was a groom of the queen’s chamber. Henry VII. gave 10 l. “for six new chariot horses.” Several entries in the Nothumberland Household Book — ed. 1827, pp. 24, 55, 120, 359, 360, and in the Collection of Regulations for the Royal Household, afford information as to the persons who were allowed horses in great establishments, and the names by which they were described as, the male horse, palfreys, nags, &c. —– expenses of breaking in, marking, driving, shoeing, baiting, &c. – Ent. 48.
  • Horsemeat, for – Ent. 24 – Provender for horses.
  • Hosen, for, – Ent. 21, 35, 45, 61 – —– for making, – Ent. 60 – —– watchet, – Ent. 60.
  • Hooks, for – Ent. 57.
  • Hoops, for eching, – Ent. 19 – See Eching.
  • Hosy, Sir John, – Ent. 46 – This person was keeper of the King’s Wards, with a salary of 100 l. a year, but he has not been otherwise identified. It may be inferred that he was the owner of the place near Havering at Bower, in Essex, where the young Lords Courtenay lived; but Morant, in his History of Essex, does not throw any light on the subject.
  • House burnt at Richmond, money given in remuneration of losses in consequence of, – Ent. 11.
  • House rent, for, – Ent. 53 – The queen’s embroiderer was allowed 2 l. per annum for his house rent.
  • Housell, for the Queen’s, – 1, 29, 51 – The Eucharist. To housel was to administer the holy communion. “The Cardinal song the masse, and after paxe, the King and the Quene descended, and before the high altar they were bothe houseled with one hoste devided betweene them.” — Hall’s Chronicle. Ed. 1809, p. 376. When the Queen takes her chamber she must be “brought into the chapell or church to bee houseled.” —Regulations of the Royal Household, temp. Henry VII., p. 125. “Toke the said John Glyn and hym ymprisoned, and in the castel in prison him kept by the space of v oures and more, so that noon of his frendes myght come where he was to releve hym with drynk, or staunche his bloode, to th’ entent that he should have bled to deth, except they suffered a Preste to come to shryve and howsell hym.” — Rolls of Parliament,Anno 1472, vol. vi. 35. Thus too, Chaucer,

    “—– —– Man and wife
    Should shew ther parish priest ther life
    Ones a yere, as saith the boke
    Ere any wight his housel toke.”

    See other examples in Todd’s Johnson, and in Nare’s Glossary. It appears that the Queen communicated thrice between March, 1502, and March, 1503, namely, on Easter Day, on All Saints Day, and on Christmas Day, and that twenty-pence were paid on each occasion “for her housel.” In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Eighth, the situations of the persons in relation to whom the word is used induced the Editor to imagine that it had another meaning than for the holy elements. In April, 1530, the two Williams, who were little better than jesters or buffoons, and Philip’s boy, were paid ten shillings each for their housel;on the 16th of the same month Richard Ap Guilliams was paid 4 s. 8 d for his housel at Easter; and on the 28th, Thomas the King’s Jester was paid 25 s. “for his howsill and his livery coat.” He is now however convinced that he was mistaken, and that the persons above mentioned received those sums to reimburse them for what they expended on communicating at Easter, they being wholly supported at the King’s expense. It is remarkable that though in 1503 the Queen of England paid but 20 d. on such occasions, yet that only twenty-eight years afterwards, the King’s minions should have been allowed ten shillings each, and that another of them should have been paid 4 s. 6 d. for the purpose. In 1497, six shillings and eightpence were paid “for the King’s offering at his Housillyng.

  • Howard, Lord, – Ent. 62 – Thomas Lord, son and heir apparent of Thomas, Earl of Surrey. He married, in 1495, the Queen’s sister, Anne, daughter of King Edward the Fourth, by whom he had two children, who died young. Lord Howard signalized himself at the battle of Flodden, and succeeded his father as Duke of Norfolk, in 1524. He was allowed 120 l. per annum by the Queen for the support of her sister.
  • Howell, Thomas ap, – Ent. 3 – William ap, – Ent. 17.
  • Humberston, Thomas, – Ent. 38, 60 – A hosier.
  • Hungary, Ambassadors of, – Ent. 6, 22 – A treaty was entered into in May, 1502, with Ladislaus, King of Hungary, that Henry should assist him against the Turks. — Fœdera, xiii. p. 5. But nothing occurs in that work to justify the idea that he then sent ambassadors to this country. The Emperor Maximillian, who also called himself King of Hungary, in April, 1502, appointed Cornelius de Burghes the Lord of Berselles, Knight of the Golden Fleece, and Indoctus Prant, Knight, his ambassadors to Henry, who, doubtless, are the persons mentioned as having been at Richmond in the May following.
  • Hungerford, Lady, – Ent. 25.
  • Hunt, Thomas, – Ent. 55 – Of the office of the confectionary.
  • Hunters, for going after, – Ent. 58.
  • Hynde, Thomas, – Ent. 34 – A mercer of London.
  • Hynsted, John, – Ent. 31, 65 – A wax chandler of London.