Part XVI.5: Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York: Ink through Money borrowed…

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  • Ink, for, – Ent. 64.
  • Ipswich, our lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Iron, for finding, – Ent. 21 – See Dean.
  • Ivory, for a box of, – Ent. 15 – —– a chest of, brought, -Ent. 9.

  • Jagging of tappetts, – Ent. 8 – To jag is to cut into indentures, now called vandykes; “j hode of blakke felwet with a typpet halfe damask and halfe felwet y jaggyd:” “j hode of depe grene felwetjakgyd, upon the rolle:” “j rydyng hode of rede felwet with iiij jaggys:” a tippet “with j jagge” — ” a jagged hode,” occur in the inventory of the effects of Sir John Fastolfe. – Archælogia, xxi. 254, 259.
  • Jackets, for, – Ent. 59 – —– for garnishing, for the disguising, – Ent. 12. See Disguising.
  • Jentille, James, See Gentle.
  • Jewels, for attendance on the queen’s, – Ent. 16, 22, 23, 33, 53 – Wages of the two grooms of the queen’s chamber, whose duty it was to take care of her majesty’s jewels.
  • Jewelry, for, – Ent. 37, 38 – Henry gave the queen, on one occasion, 31 l. 10 s. for jewels; and after her death, an entry occurs in the Privy Purse Expenses of her husband “To Steven Jenyns of London, for pledging of certain of the queen’s jewels, 100 l.” — 26 May, 1503. Part of the jewels mentioned in these accounts were for the queen against the marriage of Prince Arthur.
  • Johnes, Mrs. Eleanor, – Ent. 3, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 62, 70 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen. Though repeatedly mentioned as being in attendance on her Majesty between March and June, 1502, she is not again noticed until September, 1503, when she received her salary of 6 l. 13 s. 4 d. She was probably the wife or daughter of Robert Johnes, the King’s “welbeloved servaunt, and oon of the gromes of oure chambre,” who was specially protected in the enjoyment of the offices of Constable and Parker of Lantrishen and the Isle of Bar, in South Wales, in the Act of Resumption, 1 Hen.VII.: and also in the enjoyment of all offices and fees which had been granted to him by the Act of Resumption II Hen. Vii. – Rot. Parl. vi. 351, 471.
  • Johnson, John, a surgeon, – Ent. 8 – —– Robert, 22 – The queen’s taylor.
  • Journies, costs of, – Ent. 4, 18, 22.
  • Jubilee, letter of pardon of the, – Ent. 7 – Every twenty-fifth year was a year of jubilee, and the Holy See then granted extraordinary indulgences: of these “the letter of pardon” was the certificate, the price of which was only twelve-pence. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, 23rd September, 1501, is this entry, “To the official of Sarum that come with the money of the jubilee.” The year 1501 was the year of jubilee, and it is singular that the Princess Mary’s letter of pardon should not have been paid for until May, 1502.
  • Justice, Richard, – Ent. 4, 9, 24, 36, 40 – Page of the robes.

  • Katherine, lady, – Ent. 10, 18, 55, 62, 65 – All these entries relate to Katherine, youngest child of Edward the Fourth and wife of Lord William Courtenay, son and heir of the Earl of Devon. An account of this personage will be found in the Introductory Remarks. Henry the Seventh sent her, by her servant, in September, 1502, 10 l.
  • Kemys, Henry, – Ent. 64 – Probably a relation of the wife of Thomas Lucas the Solicitor-General. G.
  • Kendal, for, – Ent. 14 – A kind of coarse cloth.
  • Kersey, for – Ent. 14.
  • Key, for making a, – Ent. 40.
  • Kidlington, i.e. Kiddington, in Oxfordshire – Ent. 19.
  • King, the, – Ent. 5, 8, 39.
  • King’s daughter, the, – Ent. 58 – The youngest child of Henry the Seventh and Elizabeth of York, in giving birth to whom her mother lost her life. The infant was born on the 2nd of February, 1502-3, and died soon afterwards. Sandford conjectures that she was named after Katherine of Aragon, her sister-in-law, and that the princess was her god-mother; but it is more probable that she was named after her aunt, Katherine Courtenay. The entry relating to this child is for four yards of flannel for her use.
  • King’s father, the obit of the, – Ent. 29 – Edmond of Hadham, Earl of Richmond, father of Henry the Seventh, died on the 3rd of November, 1456, Dugdale’s Baronage, ii. 237 — which date agrees with the statement of 5 s. being paid on the third of November, 1502, for the queen’s offering at the celebration of the obit for that prince.
  • King’s Mother, the, Ent. 28, 56 – Margaret, Countess of Richmond, who married to her second husband, Sir Henry Stafford, younger son of Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham; and to her third, Thomas, first Earl of Derby. She died 29th June, 1509.
  • King’s Palace at Westminster, the keeper of, – Ent. 1.
  • Kirtles, for, – Ent. 21, 22 – —– for hemming and making or mending, – Ent. 4, 13, 19, 29, 58 – An explanation of kirtles will be found in a note to Bishop Beckington’s Journal. 8vo. 1828.
  • Kitchin, to the offices of the, – Ent. 1 – —– the children of the privy, – Ent. 56.
  • Knives, carving, – Ent. 59 – —– small, enamelled, – Ent. 59.
  • Knoyell, William, – Ent. 69 – A receiver of part of the queen’s revenues.
  • Kydwelly, Sir Morgan, – Ent. 53, 64 – This person, who was appointed Attorney-general by Richard the Third, was the first to desert the sovereign to whom he owed his promotion, and became one of the earliest and most zealous of Henry the Seventh’s supporters: to his treachery, Mr. Sharon Turner and other historians mainly attribute Richard’s subsequent disasters. It is remarkable that he neither retained his situation of Attorney-general after Henry’s accession nor was promoted to any judicial office. To what extent he enjoyed that monarch’s favour is uncertain, but these accounts prove that he was knighted and received a small annual fee in consequence of holding some official appointment. In the 1 Hen. VII. it is said that Richard made him a referee in a certain suit on behalf of Thomas Gyldyn, and that having obtained a knowledge of the claimant’s title, “within a little tyme after that tyme, the said Morgan marryied one Avys which pretendit to be nigh of blode to the foresaid Thomas Gyldyn” took possession of the lands in dispute, and “retained the same agenst all conscience and equyte, full ungodely, the said Morgan beying of greate myght and favored in the said shire of Dorset beying attorney to the late pretended Kyng Richard the Third.” — Rot. Parl. vi. 321. In 1503, Sir Morgan Kydwelly was one of the Commissioners for levying an aid in the County of Dorset. — Ibid. 535.
  • Kynfaire, fee farm of – Ent. 70 – Kanefare, in Staffordshire.

  • Labourers, to, – Ent. 48.
  • Laces, for, – Ent. 27, 45.
  • Ladies and gentlewomen, the queen’s, clothes of, – Ent. 22 – This entry proves that the ladies in attendance on the queen were clothed at her expense. It is remarkable, as indicative of the want of money, that this and many other bills were not wholly discharged at one payment, but that part only, in this instance not half, should be paid at one time.
  • Ladies and gentlewomen of the court, for conveying, – Ent. 9, 43, et sæpe. Vide Barge.
  • Lady of grace at St. Paul’s, – Ent. 49.
  • Lady’s, our, girdle brought, – Ent. 47. See Girdle.
  • Lakyn, Mrs. – Ent. 32 – Probably one of the queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Lambeth, – Ent. 18.
  • Lampreys baked, brought, – Ent. 54 – Lampreys were a favourite dish, and one of our early monarchs is said to have died from having supped too plentifully off them. In the Hengrave Household Accounts is this entry, “for presenting a lumprey pye vj d.
  • Langley, – Ent. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 44 – Langley, in the hundred of Chadlington, in Oxfordshire. Her majesty was there on the 5th and 6th of August, 16th and 20th of September, 2nd October, and 15th November, 1502.
  • Lands and revenues, receipts of the queen’s, – Ent. 69.
  • Langton, Henry, – Ent. 46 – An old servant of King Edward the Fourth.
  • Lanston, Robert, – Ent. 58 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Lanthony, Prior of, – Ent. 10, 19, 20, 23, 54 – —– – cheese, a, bought, – Ent. 8.
  • Larks, brought, – Ent. 47.
  • Lathes, Doctor, – Ent. 8 – Probably a physician.
  • Laton, buckles and rings of, – Ent. 38, 52 – A great deal has been said by various writers on the metal called Laton — See a note to Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. in 1532, p. 333, to which it is only necessary to add, that Palsgrave, in his Esclarissement de la Langue Francoyse, translates it by the word Laton. Laiton is still common in France, and is defined to be “cuivre jaune mêlé avec la mine de zinc ou calamine, a l’eclat d’or.” That it was of a pale yellow colour is proved by Chaucer’s saying,

    “Phœbus waxe old and hewed like laton
    That in his hote declination
    Shone as the burned gold with stremes bright:
    But now in Capricorne adoun he light
    Wher as he shone ful pale, I dare well sain.”
    Frankeleine’s Tale, v. 11557.

  • Launderer, the Queen’s – Ent. 24, 37, 62 – Agnes Dean. Her wages were 3 l. 6 s. 8 d. per annum; and when travelling, she was allowed 4 d. per diem for her horse meat.
  • Lawn, for a shirt, – Ent. 26 – Kerchiefs of lawne, nyfels, umple, or eny other manere of kerchiefs, exceeding the price of 10 s. per plight, were forbidden to be sold in England on penalty of paying 13 s. 4 d. per plight by statute 3 and 4 Edw. IV. 1463-4. — Rot. Parl. v. 505. Several pieces of lawn of the value of 3 s. and 3 s. 4 d. the ell are mentioned in the inventory of the effects of Henry the Fifth in 1423. — Ibid. iv. 239. A lawn shirt for Arthur, Prince of Wales, worked in blue silk, is in possession of John Gage, Esq., F.R.S., Dir. S.A., to whom it was given by Mary, Countess St. Martin de Tront, the representative of the Bostock family, a member of which was of the Prince of Wales’s household.
  • Lead, for, – Ent. 14.
  • Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth, – Ent. 3, 6, 8, 17, 23, 28, 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Levesey, Edmond, – Ent. 20, 23, 59 – Yeoman of the Queen’s household. His wages were 1 s. a-day.
  • Lewes, Richard, knight, – Ent. 35 – Apparently a goldsmith. —– William, – Ent. 48 – Gentleman of the Ewry.
  • Lime, for, – Ent. 48.
  • Linchelade, to our lady of, – Ent. 21.
  • Lines for making two for the Queen’s car, – Ent. 65.
  • Linnen cloth, for, – Ent. 35, 38, 41, 47, 49.
  • Liqouring, for barehides, – Ent. 20. See Barehides.
  • Litter, for making a, – Ent. 41 – —– Pins, for, – Ent. 24 – —– for coverings of the Queen’s, – 16, 65 – —– for the expenses of the Queen’s, – Ent. 24 – See Car.
  • Locks, bought, – Ent. 6, 12, 40, 42, 48.
  • Lock, Mrs., – Ent. 8, 22, 57 – A silkwoman.
  • Lodgings, for preparing, – Ent. 20, 23, 26, 31, 32, 42, 43, 58, 59, 61 – Expenses incurred in preparing for the queen’s reception at the various places to which she went.
  • London, Mayor of, – 16, 25 – In the 17 Hen. VII. 1501-2, Sir John Shaa Goldsmith, whose name again occurs in these Accounts, was Mayor of London: his successor was Sir Bartholomew Rede, son of Robert Rede, of Crowhurst, in Norfolk.
  • Long, Sir John, – Ent. 27.
  • Lorimer, to a, for bits, – Ent. 61.
  • Loryden, Marques, a minstrel, – Ent. 63.
  • Loveday, Ann, – Ent. 20 – A nun at Elnestow.
  • Lovel, Lady, – Ent. 8, 9 – Perhaps the wife of Sir Thomas Lovel, mentioned in the next note; but her maiden name has not been ascertained. She presented the Queen with a box of ivory, having the passion of our Lord engraved thereon, in May, 1502, and seems to have left Richmond, where the Queen was staying, on the 24th of that month. —– Sir Thomas, – 70 – Apparently the “Thomas Lovell, of Beecheham Wells, Gentleman,” who was attainted of high treason, 1 Ric. III. – Rot. Parl. vi. 246, but which was reversed in the 1 Hen. VII. – Ibid. p. 273, and, it is presumed, was the person who was protected in the enjoyment of various gratns in the act of assumption of the 1 Hen. VII. — Rot. Parl. vi. 284, 286, 345; by the act restoring John Lord Zouche in the 11 Hen. VII. — Ibid. p. 486; and in the act of attainder of Francis Viscount Lovell, in the same year. — Ibid. p. 503. On the accession of Henry VII., Sir Thomas Lovell was made Chancellor of the Exchequer, a Privy Councillor, and Speaker of the House of Commons. In 1487, he was knighted at the battle of Stoke; in 1502, was made Treasurer of the Household, was a Knight of the Garter, and one of the Executors of Henry’s will. By Henry the Eighth he was as much esteemed as by the preceding monarch; and he appointed him Constable of the Tower, Surveyor of the Court of Wards, and Steward of his house. He died at Enfield, 25th of May, 1524. These Accounts state that he advanced the Queen 100 l. on plate. Notices of this person will be found in Blomfield’sHistory of Norfolk, under the parish of Harling.
  • Lute, to Giles, a luter, for strings for the Queen of Scots’ lute, – Ent. 17 – A lute given to her sister the Princess Mary by her father in 1504 cost 13 4 d, — Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII. In those accounts is a notice of 13 s. 4 d. being paid to “Watt the luter that played the fool.” Among the Hengrave Household Expenses, in 1573, is “For stringing, tuning, and fretting my mistresses lute, ij s. vj d..” — Gage’s History of Hengrave, p. 197. In the Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807, vol. iii. p. 406, some curious verses will be found, descriptive of various musical intruments temp. Henry VII., from the Lodge at Lekingfeld.
  • Lybert, John, goldsmith – Ent. 4, 6, 37, 54 – It seems that this person was often sent for from London to attend the Queen, and that on one occasion her majesty honored him and another goldsmith called Vanderf with a present of a buck between them.
  • Lyer, for blue, – Ent. 56, – —– of thread, – Ent. 38 – See Lyour in the notes to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV. infra.
  • Lynche, Mr., – Ent. 8, 33 – A Physician. “14th April 1492 to Master Lynche the physician 3 l. 6 s. 8 d.” — Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII.
  • Lynne, John, – Ent. 66 – A wheelwright of London.

  • Machene, Robert, – Ent. 41, 47 – A taylor.
  • Major, Nicholas, – Ent. 1, 6, 8 – The queen’s sadler. — Query if he was the “Nicholas Major” who was one of the commissioners for levying the aid in the borough of Southwark, for knighting of the Prince of Wales in 1503. — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 537.
  • Malvesey, bought, – Ent. 12 – A misprint for Malnesey, i.e. Malmsey Wine.
  • Marcazin, Janyn, – Ent. 63 – A minstrel.
  • Marcle, co. Hereford, – Ent. 70 – This manor was one of those assigned to the queen’s dower. — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 462.
  • Marquess, Lady, – Ent. 33 – Apparently Cecily, wife of Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, the queen’s half brother. The marchioness was the daughter and heiress of William Baron Bonvile and Harington: after her husband’s death, she married Henry Stafford, Earl of Wiltshire, and died in 1530. She held the manor of Multon in Lincolnshire, which by her will she gave to her son Richard Grey.
  • Mary, Lady, – Ent. 7, 13 – The queen’s third daughter. She was born in 1498; and at the age of eighteen, married Louis XII. King of France; after whose death she became the wife of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and died on 25th June, 1553. A further account of her will be found in the Introductory Remarks.
  • Mason, to a, – Ent. 15.
  • Masses for saying, when the queen was ill, – Ent. 21.
  • Massy, Alice, the queen’s midwife, – Ent. 64 – Her salary was 10 l. per annum, which was the same sum as was granted to Margaret Cobbe, the wife of John Cobbe, midwife to Elizabeth, Queen of Edward the Fourth, on 15th April, 1469. — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 70.
  • Mathew, Nicholas, – Ent. 41 – Yeoman of the queen’s chamber.
  • Maundy, clothes for, &c. given to poor women on the queen’s, – Ent. 1, 2, 44, 52 – On Maunday Thursday it was customary for sovereigns and other persons of rank, in imitation of our Saviour, to wash the feet of as many poor people of their own sex as they were years old, and to give them clothes, money &c. An account of the “Order of the Maundy, made at Greenwich, 19th March, 1572,” is printed in the first volume of the Archæologia; and the Northumberland Household Book contains a minute description of the articles which were given by the Earls of Northumberland on that occasion, p. 354. At present, alms, &c. are distributed to the same number of persons, of both sexes, according to the age of the king, by the royal almoner; but the more humiliating part of the ceremony is not performed, even by deputy. His Holiness the Pope, however, still adheres strictly to the ancient form, by annually washing the feet of several poor people, and giving alms to each. It appears from the Northumberland Household Book, that the earl, or whoever performed the ceremony for him, wore a kind of mourning gown at the time, made of broad violet cloth, furred with black lamb, “containing two and a helf keippes, after thirty skins in a kepe,” p. 355.
  • Medicines, for, – Ent. 54.
  • Merschet, Hans, – Ent. 35 – A mercer.
  • Messagier, a, i.e. a messenger, – Ent. 63.
  • Messages, for going, – Ent. 36 – Several notices relative to the King’s Messengers occur on the Rolls of Parliament; and in the 12th Henry VI. the expenses of them were 200 l. The Liber Quotidianus Garderobæ of the 28th Edward I., and othere wardrobe accounts of our early monarchs and princes, contain some curious particulars of the messengers of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. In the Northumberland Household Book, one division relates to “allowances of persons sent on messages,” p. 118.
  • Metingham, Alice, – Ent. 7.
  • Middelmore, John, – Ent. 70 – Receiver of the revenues of the queen’s lands in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. He was one of the commissioners in Worcestershire for collecting the subsidy in 1496. — Rot. Parl. vi. 518.
  • Midwife, the queen’s, – Ent. 64 – Alice Massy. See Massy.
  • Milan, St. Peter of, – Ent. 2.
  • Milk, for, – Ent. 8, 13, 31.
  • Ministers of the king’s chapel, – Ent. 13, 55.
  • Minories, to the Abbess of the, – Ent. 5, 31 – —– to nuns there, – Ent. 5, 31.
  • Minstrels, the queen’s, – Ent. 23, 56 –—– coats of white and green sarcenet for, against the “disguising,” – Ent. 47 – —– the King’s,47, 56 – —– the Duke of York’s, – Ent. 47 – —– the Duke of Buckingham’s, – Ent. 47 – —— the Queen of Scots’, – Ent. 53 – —— to a, that played on a droon, – Ent. 1 – —– wages of, – Ent. 63 – Dr. Percy has written so elaborately on the subject of minstrels that it is only necessary to refer to his essay. It appears from these Accounts that minstrels formed part of the establishment of every branch of the royal family, and of the household of other eminent noblemen. The wages of the queen’s minstrels were 3 l. 6 s. 8 d. per annum each, and on every occasion, when she rewarded those of the king, of her daughter, the queen of Scots, and others, it may be presumed that they played before her. It is evident that minstrels took a prominent part in all “disguisings,” and other festivities, on which occasions we learn they wore the Tudor livery of white and green. 5 l. were paid to three string minstrels for their wages. — Additional MS. 7099.
  • Minster Lovel, – Ent. 27, 31, 32, 33 – In Oxfordshire. The queen was there on the 6th and 8th of October, 1502, on her progress into Wales.
  • Mint, officers of the, – Ent. 57 – Forty shillings were given them in reward, in consequence of the queen’s visit to the mint, in February, 1503.
  • Miserden Park, in Gloucestershire, – Ent. 21.
  • Misrule, to the Lord of, – Ent. 56 – A “Lord” or “Abbot of Misrule,” was always appointed at Christmas, in the king’s house, wherever he lodged, as well as in the houses of all persons of consequence; he presided over the sports and festivities at Christmas. Some observations on the Lord of Misrule will be found in the Archæologia, xviii. p. 313; in the Gentleman’s Magazine, xlix. p. 341; Brand’s Popular Antiquities, and in Strutt’s Sports and Pastimes. In a letter from the council of the household of the princess, afterwards Queen Mary, to Cardinal Wolsey, dated 27th November, 1527, they beg to be informed “for the great repaire of straungers supposed unto the Pryncesse honorable householde this solempne fest of Cristmas,” of the Cardinal’s pleasure “concernyng as well a ship of silver for the almes disshe requysite for her high estate, and spice plats, as also for trumpets and a rebek to be sent, and wither we shall appoynte any Lord of Mysrule for the said honorable householde, provide for enterluds, disguysyngs, or pleyes in the said fest, or for banket on twelf nyght.” — Elllis’s Original Letters, First Series, l. p. 271. The “Lord of Misrule” was rewarded by the queen with twenty shillings, as much as was given to all the pages of her chamber. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, payments are noticed “To Bingley, Lord of Misrule, upon a prest, C s.” “Bingeley, Abbot of Misrule.” To the Abbot of Misrule in reward, 6 l. 13 s. 4 d., “on new year’s day, 1503.” “The Abbot of Unreason” seems to have been another name for the same person. — See a note to the Northumberland Household Book, Ed. 1827, p. 441.
  • Money borrowed for the queen, and for which her plate was pawned, – Ent. 7, 70 – In May, 1502, she borrowed 456 l. 13 s. 4 d. for part of which her plate was pawned, a practise common with many of our early sovereigns. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII. are the following entries relative to money borrowed by the queen. Anno 12 Hen. VII. “To the queen, to pay her debts, which is to be repaid, 2000 l.” Anno 16, “To the queen, in loan on certain plate, 500 l.” — and about two years after her majesty’s decease, To “William Halyland, for plegging out of certain plate of the queen’s, 102 l.” — Additional MS. 7099.