Part XVI.6: Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York: Money lent… through Pins.

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  • Money lent to the queen, – Ent. 7, 11, 46, 57 – These items relate to trifling sums advanced by the queen’s attendants for some immediate purpose, and which were soon afterwards repaid them.
  • Monk, to a, for bringing our Lady’s girdle, – Ent. 47 – See Girdle. – —– expenses of making a, – Ent. 61 – These expenses could not have been very great, as, together with the cost of his funeral, they only amounted to 13 s. 4 d.
  • Monmouth, – Ent. 21, 24, 25 – The queen visited this place in August, 1502.
  • Moray, the bishop of, – Ent. 39 – Andrew Foreman was bishop of Moray from 1501 to 1516, when he was translated to St. Andrew’s, and died in 1522.
  • Mordaunt, John, serjeant at law, – Ent. 63 – Father of John, 1st Lord Mordaunt, and ancestor of the Earls of Peterborough and Monmouth. Though a lawyer, he commanded a division of the king’s army at the battle of Stoke in 1484; was Speaker of the House of Commons in the 3rd Hen. VII., Rot. Parl. vi. p. 386; was constituted King’s Sergeant in he 11th, and Justice of Chester in the 15th Henry VII., and soon after became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Collins says he was knighted in February, 1503 and died in September 1504. Peerage, Ed. 1799, iii. p. 239.
  • Mordaunt, William, attorney in the Common Pleas, – Ent. 63 – William Mordaunt, of Hempstead, in Esssex, esq., younger brother of Sir John, and ancestor of the Mordaunts of Warwickshire. He was chief prothonortary of the Common Pleas, and died in 1518, Ibid. p. 238, and Edmondson’s Baronagium.
  • Morgan, Griffith, – Ent. 27 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Mortimer, – Ent. 48 – Stratfeld Mortimer, in Berkshire, which formed part of the lands assigned to the queen’s dower. — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 462. —–Worthy, – Ent. 69.
  • Mortimer, Sir John, – Ent. 6 – Probably the “John Mortimer, esquire of the king’s body,” who was protected from the effects of the act of Resumption of 22 Edward IV. — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 201; and the “Sir John Mortymer,” who was protected in the office of steward of several lordships in Worcestershire and of the keepership of the Park of Nethewode, in Herefordshire, in the 1 Hen. VII. — Ibid.p. 352; and who, in 1503, was one of the Commisisoners in Worcestershire for levying the subsidy. — Ibid. p. 535.
  • Mortlake, – Ent. 52.
  • Mouth, cook for the queen’s, – Ent. 47 – See Cook.
  • Montjoy, Lord, his child christened, – Ent. 19 – William Blount, 4th Lord Montjoy: he succeeded to the barony in 1485, and after filling many high situations under Henry the Seventh and Henry the Eighth, died in 1535. It may be inferred that her Majesty was sponsor to his child, who was christened in June or July, 1502.
  • Myklowe, John, – Ent. 39 – Clerk of the controulment of the king’s household.
  • Mylner, Richard, of Byndfeld, – Ent. 35.

  • Nails, for, – Ent. 65.
  • Nanfan, Sir Richard, – Ent. 67 – A “Richard Nanfan, late of Trethowle Squyer,” was attainted in 1st Ric. III., but his attainder was reversed in the 1 Hen. VII. A person of those names, and an esquire, if it was not the same individual, was protected in the enjoyment of the offices of steward of the lordship of Tewksbury, and keeper of the lodge and park there; of steward of the lordship of Elmley in the county of Worcester, &c., and in the office of sheriff of that county, by the act of Resumption, 1 Hen. VII.: in all grants made to him, by a similar act, in the 3rd Hen. VII.; and by the name of “Sir Richard Nanfan, Knight,” it was enacted in the 4 Hen. VII. that the reversal of the attainder of John Beaumont, Esq. should not affect the lands of Tregonan, in Cornwall, but that he should hold and enjoy the same. — Rot. Parl. vi. pp. 246, 273, 360, 406, 413. There was an ancient Cornish family of Nanfan of Trethewell, many of which were sheriffs of Cornwall in the fifteenth century, and which became extinct in the male line in the sixteenth century. A branch of the Nanfan family was settled in Worcestershire, and a copious pedigree of them occurs in Nash’s history of that county.
  • Nattres, Natarasse, or Notarice, James, 7, 49, 55, 60 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Nelmes, Thomas, – Ent. 5 – Another of the queen’s servants.
  • Neville, Lady, – Ent. 1 – See Darcy.
  • New Year’s Gifts, – Ent. 55, 56, 61.
  • Newbury, – Ent. 49.
  • Norfolk, Duchess of, – Ent. 3 – The person thus designated must, it is presumed, have been Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir of Sir Frederick Tilney, then the wife of Thomas Howard Earl of Surrey, son and heir of John, first Duke of Norfolk, which dukedom was then in the crown by the duke’s attainder, and the earl was not created Duke of Norfolk until 1514, eight years after her death. It is consequently not a little extraordinary that she should be styled Duchess of Norfolk in 1502; but as the widow of John the first duke died in 1494, there was no other person to whom the title of duchess of Norfolk could be attributed. She was ordered to receive the wife of Edmond de la Pole, the queen’s nephew, who bore the title of Earl of Suffolk, apparently by courtesy only, the dukedom having been forfeited by his elder brother John de la Pole Earl of Lincoln in 1487, and who was attainted for supporting Perkin Warbek, in the 19 Hen. VII. 1503 — Rot. Parl. vi. p. 545. The “Duchess of Norfolk” was present at the reception of Katherine of Aragon in the 17 Hen. VII., 1502-3. — Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807, vol ii. p. 290*, 291*.
  • Northleache in Gloucestershire, – Ent. 23.
  • Northampton, to the Holy Rood of, and our Lady of Grace there, – Ent. 2, 21.
  • Northumberland, Earl of, – Ent. 22 – Henry Algernon Percy, K.G. 5th Earl. He succeeded to the earldom in 1489, and died in 1527.
  • Norwich, Bishop of, – Ent. 56 – Richard Nekke, or Nyk, dean of the king’s chapel; he was confirmed in this see in 1501, and died in 1536.
  • Notarice. See Nattres.
  • Notley, a Priory in Buckinghamshire, – Ent. 18, 22, 26 – The queen was there in July 1502, and a messenger was sent to her at that place to know where she wished that her nephew, Lord Edward Courtenay, should be buried.
  • Nuns of the Minories, donations to, – Ent. 31.
  • Nun, expenses of making a, – Ent. 20 – —– a buck brought for the professing of a, – Ent. 25 – The expenses on this occasion ammounted to 6 l. 13 s. 4 d., and a feast apprears to have been part of the ceremony, as a buck was specially sent from Harold.
  • Nurse, to a lady that was to have been the queen’s, – Ent. 36 – —– of the Lord Edward Courtenay, – Ent. 65 – — — to a French woman, that was to have been the queen’s, – Ent. 41 – These persons seem to have offered themselves as the queen’s nurse in the confinement which proved fatal to her; but neither appears to have been accepted. Each was, however, rewarded with 6 s. 8 d for her trouble in coming. —– to the queen’s brother’s, – Ent. 44 – This item displays the affection which the queen bore to her unfortunate brother the young Duke of York, who, with Edward the Fifth, was said to have been murdered in the Tower. The donation, though trifling in itself, was a special mark of favour, as the poor woman is not included in the thirty-seven who received the Maundy. Particualr attention was paid by the royal family to their nurses and old servants, as is exemplified by many entries in these accounts. Henry the Fifth, in 1415, granted Joan Warren, his nurse, 20l. for life. — Calend. Rot. Parl. p. 264. In the 28th Hen. VI., Joan, widow of Thomas Astley, esquire, “oure servaunt and late oure norice,” was protected in the enjoyment of an annuity of 20 l. for her life out of the fee farm of Queenhithe, in the city of London, and also in the sum of 30 l., parcel of an annuity of 40 l. granted her by letters patent out of the revenues of the County of Warwick; and in the 34th Hen. VI. she was secured in the enjoyment of forty marks , parcel of fifty marks, yearly granted her by letters patent for her life. — Rot. Parl. 199, 319. Philip ap Hoell, who is described in the act of Resumption, 3 Hen. VII., as “oure old servaunt and well beloved nurriour,” was protected in the grant of the Portreaveship of Lanvayl in Buelld, with the toll of that town, and the toll of Elvale, in the marches of Wales. — Rot. Parl. vi. 406. The following entry occurs in the Privy Purse Expenses of that Monarch: “To the King’s nurse’s son;” “To the Queen’s dry norisse, in reward, 3 l. 6 s. 8 d.” on the 31st May, 1503, who may be presumed, from the date, to have been the person who attended her in her last illness.

  • Obit of the King’s father, – Ent. 28 – See King’s Father.
  • Obourne, i.e. Holborn, Abbot of, – Ent. 28.
  • Odiham, – Ent. 69 – —– Keeper of the Park of, – Ent. 51 – In the county of Southampton. Nicholas Gaynesford and John Gaynesford, Esquires, were secured in the enjoyment of the offices of Steward of the Lordship of Odiham, the Constableship and Portership of the Castle of Odiham, with the keeping of the park and warren, which had been granted to them for their lives, by the act of Resumption, in the 1st Hen. VII. – Rot. Parl. vi. 384.
  • Offerings, for the Queen’s, – Ent. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 23, 26, 28, 29, 37, 39, 46, 47, 51, 53, 54, 60 – The whole amount paid as the Queen’s offerings between the 24th March, 1502, and February, 1503, was about 32 l> 10 s. The donations varied from 4 d. to 2 l. 6 s. 8 d. in proportion to the reputation of the shrine’ and on one occasion a plyte of lawn was bought for a shirt for the Child of Grace at Reading, which, with the making, cost 5 s. 4 d. Besides sending offerings at certain times to various shrines, her Majesty “offered” to the nearest saint to the places through which she passed on her progress, and also bestowed alms on all the hermits and anchoresses on her road. Several pages of the Northumberland Household Book are filled with an account of the offerings of the Earl and Countess of Northumberland, and their children, pp. 332-338.
  • Ointment, for, – Ent. 65 – Grease for the wheels of the queen’s car.
  • Oranges, brought, – Ent. 2, 23, 53, 57.
  • Oxford, – Ent. 24, 33 – —– fee farm of the city of, – Ent. 70 – Earl of, – Ent. 53 – John de Vere, K.G., Lord High Admiral and Great Chamberlain. He was restored to the honours forfeited by his father in 1464, attainted in 1474, again restored in 1485; and died without issue in 1513.

  • Packthread, for, – Ent. 38.
  • Pages and grooms of the Queen’s Chamber, rewards to, – Ent. 47, 56.
  • Painting, – Ent. 20 – The only entry in these accounts relative to painting or painters is that, on 3rd August, 1502, three shillings and fourpence were given in reward to Robert Fyll, the King’s painter, and on that same day, John Reynold, painter, received 10 s. “for making of divers beasts and other pleasures” for the Queen, at Windsor, and which it would seem did not require much talent; hence it is probable that he was little superior to a sign-painter of the present day. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, are entries of twenty shillings paid “to Maynard the King’s painter for pictures;” 4 l. to “Thomas Painter for painting;” “To Thomas Stirr for painting two tabernacles, 6 l.;” and “To Robert Fylle, for making of the same, 8 l.” “For making and painting of knotts, 66 l. 13 s. 4 d.” The two last named persons, Maynard and John Reynolds, were probably the best artists of their times in England; but “Thomas Painter,” it may be presumed, was a house-painter, one or more of whom were attached to the royal and other great establishments. — See Collection of Regulations of the Royal Household and the Northumberland Household Book, where “j paynter” is mentioned among the Earl’s workmen in the same passage with the joiner and smith, pp. 255, 390. In the Churchwardens’ Accounts of St. Margaret’s, Westminster, in 1531, is this entry: “Paid to Renaeever, payntour, for paynting and gylding of the LX storys of St. Margarett’s tabernacle, 3 l. 6 s. 8 d.,” and for “guilding of the small tabernacle, 2 l. 8 s.” — Nichols’ Illustrations of Ancient Times, p. 10. Among the New Year’s Gifts to Queen Mary, in 1556, by Suete, painter, is a table painted of the Queen’s marriage. — Ibid. p. 14.
  • Palfreyman, the, – Ent. 10 – Richard Payne.
  • Palfreys, for keeping, – Ent. 10.
  • Pallet, Edward, – Ent. 45, 61 – Son of Lady Jane Bangham. This lad appears to have been wholly supported at the Queen’s expense, and, like her nephews, the Courtenays, was under the care of Dame Margaret Cotton, as payments were made to that lady for his diet, clothes, and school hire, and the allowance for his board was fully equal to that for his more illustrious companions. It would be vain to inquire into the cause of his being thus patronized; nor have any other particulars of him been discovered. — See Bangham.
  • Paned curtains, – Ent. 38 – “Paned, veriegated, composed of small squares, as a counterpane usually is.” — Todd’s Johnson. See “Pane” in the Index to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.,infra.
  • Pantry, gentleman of the, – Ent. 59 – Richard Brampton.
  • Paper, for, – Ent. 64.
  • Parchment, for, – Ent. 64.
  • Pardon, for a letter of the Jubilee, – Ent. 7 – See Jubilee. —–of the Monastery of St. Katherine’s, in Sinai, – Ent. 12 – the Queen’s offering to the coffer for her, – Ent. 1 – The Queen’s payment to the poor-box in performance of some of the conditions of obtaining the Easter indulgence. In 1491 the Marquess of Berkeley ordered in his will that his executors should purchase a pardon from Rome, as large as might be had for plain remission of the sins of all those who shall be confessed and contrite, at Longebrigge [a chapel in the parish of Berkeley] from even song to even song, on the feast of the Trinity, and there say paternosters, and three aves for his soul, and the souls of his father and son. Chaucer’s description of one of those itinerant venders of mercy and relicks, who —

    “Bret-ful of pardon come from Rome all hot,”
    And who, “with fained flattering and japes,
    –made the persone and the peple his apes”

    is well known. Of this character probably were the two Monks of St. Katherine’s Mount, in Sinai, and the monk who brought Our Lady’s girdle to the Queen. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., in June, 1511, is an entry of 20 s. “For the King’s offering at Westminster, and for taking of the Pardon, there, at Ascencion Tide.” Add. MS. 7100.

  • Parker, —–, – Ent. 48 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Paston, William, – Ent. 3 – Page of the Queen’s beds.
  • Patch, —– – Ent. 44, 57 – Mr. Douce has suggested that Patch was another designation for a fool; and the conjecture is in this instance confirmed by an entry in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh, of money given “To Patch the Fool, in reward,” who appears to have been principally concerned in arranging the Disguisings. — See Disguisings.
  • Pawmpelion, a fur so called, – Ent. 19, 54 – This word occurs in the same sense in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. in 1532. “For xxv dousin skynns of fyne pawmpelion, lx li;” and in the account book of Lord Burghley, among the apparel bought for Anne of Cleves, was, “A gown of black wrought vellvet, furred with pawmpillon, viij li.” The price of those skins in 1503 was nearly the same. The word does not appear in any glossary, and the Editor conjectures from the name, that they were skins brought from Pampellone, a town in the department of Tarn, twelve miles from Alby, but Mr. Gage suggests that Pampeluna fur is meant.
  • Payne, Master Richard, – Ent. 1, 3, 39, 61 – The Queen’s almoner – —– Richard, – Ent. 10 – The Queen’s palfreyman then deceased.
  • Pears, brought, – Ent. 21.
  • Peas cods, brought, – Ent. 9.
  • Peche, Dame Elizabeth, – Ent. 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Penson, Robert, – Ent. 60 – A skinner.
  • Pepins, – Ent. 5, 9, 22.
  • Percy, Lady Anne, – Ent. 12, 15, 16, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 41, 47 – Though not mentioned in the list in Ent. #62, she was undoubtedly one of the Queen’s gentlewomen, and appears to have been in constant attendance from June to December, 1502. By the name of “Lady Anne Percy,” she received an annuity of 20 l. until 1st Hen. VIII., 1509. — Additional MS. 7100. She was probably Anne, 2nd daughter of Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumber, who married William Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, about the 28th December, 1510, 2 Hen. VIII., when the King paid 6 s. 8d. for his offering at her marriage. — Ibid.
  • Performing, i.e. for making a horse harness, gown, &c., – Ent. 10.
  • Pertriche, John, – Ent. 66 – The son of a person called “Mad Beale,” who was supported at the Queen’s expense. The reason of his being so patronised is unknown, but it probably arose from motives of charity, arising from his parent’s infirmity. That one of the entries about him should be mentioned in Accounts intended for the Queen’s eye is strongly indicative of the coarse manners of the time.
  • Petreson, Evan, – Ent. 4 – A joiner.
  • Petticoats, for, – Ent. 13, 41.
  • Pevesham, – Ent. 39 – —– forest of, – Ent. 24.
  • Pew, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2, 12, 13, 46, 47 – Of Westminster. Our Lady of Pity or Mercy, an image of the Virgin Mary, sitting with our Saviour on her lap.
  • Pheasants, brought, – Ent. 35.
  • Phip, William, – Ent. 3, 15, 35 – Alias William Worthy; these payments were for boarding William the Queen’s fool, for which he was allowed two shillings a month.
  • Physician, a, sent for, – Ent. 60 – The queen died in childbed on the 11th of February, 1502-3; and it is evident that this payment was for the expenses of the messenger who was sent by the king’s command to fetch Dr. Hallylsworth out of Kent to attend her majesty when she became in danger. The names of most of the physicians mentioned in these accounts, and in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry the Seventh and Eighth, are here collected. Those noticed in the queen’s expenses are Doctors Halyllysworth, and Master Lynch. In the expenses of Henry the Seventh, the folloiwng names occur: “To Master Lewes, the queen’s physician, 2 l.” “Ralph Sentiler;” “Master Domynys, the physician;” “Vincent Wolf, the physician;” “Master Guilliam, the physician.” Benet Fentre was another of the physicians of Henry VII., with a salary of 40 l. per ann., and was keeper of the prince’s wardrobe in London. — Rot. Parl. vi. 355. In the 2nd Hen. VIII., “Master Lewes, the Princess of Castile’s physician, was paid 100 l. for his reward in gold;” and in 1532, Doctor Yakisley is notices in the Privy Purse Expenses of that year.
  • Pieces of copper, to ornament the jackets against the disguising, – Ent. 12.
  • Pilgrimage, costs for, person sent on, by the queen, – Ent. 2, 60 – Vicarious pilgrimages were by no means uncommon. Queen Katherine of Arragon desired in her will that some person should go to Our Lady of Walsingham in pilgrimage, and in going by the way dole twenty nobles. William de Beauchamp, in 1268, speaks of his son Walter being signed with the cross for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land on the behalf of his father and mother. Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, in 1361, desired that a chaplain of good conidition might be sent to Jerusalem, principally for himself and his parents, who was to say masses by the way at all times that he could conveniently do so for their and his souls; and also that a good and loyal man should be sent to Canterbury and to offer there 40 s. in silver for him, and another of Pomfret to offer the same sum at the tomb of Thomas Earl of Lancaster. Sir John Northwode of Kent, in 1376, desired that two pilgrims might be sent to visit the shadow of St. Peter, St Paul, and St. James in Galacia. Sir Richard Arundel, in 1416, ordered his executors to find a man who, for the good of his soul, should go to Rome, to the Holy Land, to the sepulchre of our Lord, and to the Holy Blood in Germany; and William Ponte of Kent, in 1471, bequeathed a shilling to any one who would “pilgrimage for me” to St. Thomas of Canterbury: but the most striking instance of delegating religious duties is that of Sir Roger Beauchamp, in 1379, who says in his will, “Whereas I am bound to do a service on the infidels by desire of my grandsire, Sir Walter Beauchamp, to the expense of two hundred marks, I will that Roger, son to Roger, my son, shall perform the same when he comes of age;” the fulfillment of the obligation being thus postponed for four generations. The queen adopted this easy method of settling with her conscience on three occasions: once, by sending a priest to make offerings in her name to shrines at Windsor, Eton, Reading, Caversham, Cockthorpe, Northampton, Walsingham, Sudbury, and Ipswich, who was occupied on his pious tour twenty-six days and was allowed for his expenses and trouble ten-pence a day; secondly, to a person, who does not appear to have been a priest, for going to various shrines in Kent, who was so employed at the same wages for eight days; and lastly, by sending a man on pilgrimage to Our Lady of Wilsdon in February, 1503, who received 3 s. 4 d. for his trouble. An interesting article on shrines and pilgrimages will be found inRetrospective Review, New Series, vol. ii. p. 301, and some remarks on the subject occur in the review of the Itinerary of Fitz Simeon, in the same volume.
  • Pins, for the queen’s litter, – Ent. 24.