Part XVI.7: Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York: Pin-powder through Stable, the expenses…

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  • in-powder, for – Ent. 15 – Query, powder for cleaning pins.
  • Plate, paid for, which had been burnt in a fire at Richmond, – Ent. 57 – —– pawned, 7, 70 – See Money. —– for attendance with the queen’s, – Ent. 44.
  • Pleasures, for painting beasts, and other, – Ent. 20 – The word is used in a similar sense in the ordinance for the royal household 17 Hen. VIII. “Dispoile of pleasures and commodities in nobleman’s houses to be left.” Also such “pleasures and commodities as they have about their houses, that is to say, deer, fish, orchards, hay,” &c. p. 145. Mr. Gage remarks that in the survey of Thornbury in Gloucestershire on the attainder of Edward Duke of Buckingham in 1521, the gardens are mentioned as set “with roses and other pleasures.” “Pleasure grounds” is still in use.
  • Plomer, Mr. Christopher, – Ent. 21, 35 – One of the queen’s chaplains. Probably the Christopher Plummer who was collated to the Prebendary of Cadington, in St. Paul’s, 9th July, 1515, and who became Canon of Windsor, but was deprived by attainder for refusing the oath of supremacy in 1536. — Wood’s Fasti Oxonienses by Bliss, i. 78.
  • Plyte of lawn, for a shirt, – Ent. 26 – The word plight occurs in the statute respecting lawns in 1463; (See Lawn) — which induced Blount in his Law Dictionary to think it meant “a measure then in use, as yard or ell now.” — “Playte of a gown,” the only work like it in Palsgrave’s Esclarissement de la Langue Francoyse in 1590, he tranlsates ply.
  • Points, for jackets, – Ent. 12 – —– of silk for a litter, – Ent. 24.
  • Pole, Henry, – Ent. 5 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Pole, William, – Ent. 20, 23, 26, 32, 33, 58, 59 – A groom of the chamber, whose wages were 10 d. a-day.
  • Pomegranets, brought, – Ent. 44, 57.
  • Pomfret, – Ent. 47.
  • Popingay, a, brought, – Ent. 17.
  • Popyncote, Joan, – Ent. 13 – This person, who, it may be presumed, was one of the queen’s servants, was living in the 1st Henry VIII., as in that year fifty shillings were paid to her. — Additional MS.in the British Museum, 7100.
  • Pork, chines of, brought, – Ent. 37.
  • Porters, at the gate, – Ent. 1.
  • Possenet, mending of a, – Ent. 18 – A little bason, a porringer, a skillet. — Todd’s Johnson. Palsgrave mentions “Posnet, a lyttle potte,” but he gives no translation of the word. In the inventory of Sir Peter Freshevile in 1581, is this entry, “Item, brass potts and posnets with a chaufer, xlvj s. viij d.” — Nichols’s Illustrations of Ancient Times, p. 234.
  • Pote, Joan, – Ent. 50 – An embroiderer.
  • Pox, the French, for healing a person of the, – Ent. 66.
  • Poyntz, William, – Ent. 70 – Receiver of the queen’s revenues in Essex.
  • Priests, to, for singing at various places, – Ent. 64.
  • Primer, for a, – Ent. 64 – The cost of a primer and psalter was 1 s. 6 d. In the 18 Hen. VII. 6 l. 13 s. 8 d. were given to Friar Hercules for a psalter, which it must be inferred from the price was illuminated.
  • Prince, the, to one of his footman, – Ent. 27 – —– the marriage of the, – Ent. 1 – —– jewellery bought against his marriage, – Ent. 38 – “The Prince” was Arthur, Prince of Wales, the queen’s eldest son, who was born September 20, 1486; married Katherine of Arragon on the 14th of November, 1501; and died on the 2nd of April, 1502.
  • Prince, his schoolmaster, – Ent. 16 – —– a servant of, – Ent. 27 – —– a minstrel of, – Ent. 47 – Henry, then Prince of Wales, the queen’s second son, afterwards Henry the Eighth. The entry relating to the schoolmaster may, however, refer to his deceased brother.
  • Princess, the, – Ent. 6, 8, 23, 25, 29, 34 – Each of these entries allludes to Katherine of Arragon, the widow of Prince Arthur, and they admit of the inference that she was treated with great attention by her mother-in-law.
  • Psalter, for a, – Ent. 66 – The price of a psalter and primer was 20 s. See Primer.
  • Privy Seal, fool of the Lord, – Ent. 56 – See Fool.
  • Prothonotary of Spain, – Ent. 2 – A person who probably came over with the princess Katherine.
  • Puddings, brought, – Ent. 6, 37.
  • Purfle, – Ent. 9, 50 – A kind of border, hem, or rather, trimming of gowns. Palsgrave, in 1530, translates, “Purfyll a hemme of a gowne” by “bort.” In the 37th Edw. III. esquires and gentles below the rank of knights who had not lands of the value of 100 l. a-year, and their wives, daughters, and children were forbidden to wear “ascun revers ou purfil.” — Rot. Parl. 278, 281. Chaucer, speaking of the Monk, says

    “I saw his sleves purfiled at the hond,
    With gris and that the finest of the lond.”

    Eleanor Lady Walsyngham bequeathed her daughter “a purfle of sable” in 1506. Purfle, in Ent. #50, is used as a verb, and there means to embroider, crule being twisted yarn. In the inventory of the effects of Sir John Fastolfe is “j gowne of blewe felwett upon felwet longe furrid withe martyrs and perfold of the same, slevys sengle.” — Archæologia, xxi. 252.

  • Purse, money for the queen’s, – Ent. 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31, 35, 36, 46, 47, 48, 51, 55, 56 – Money for the queen’s personal expenses, or, for pocket-money.
  • Pursuivant of the King’s Chamberlain, – Ent. 53.
  • Pyle cloth, a, – Ent. 38 – No other instance of the use of this word has been discovered. A Pyle cloth seems to have been a kind of testor or canopy with curtains.

  • Quails, brought, – Ent. 8.
  • Queen, ill, – Ent. 21 – —– a physician sent after, for the, – Ent. 60 – —– brother, of the, – Ent. 44 – The young Duke of York. See Nurse. – —– land, charged with, money for the king’s use, – Ent. 46 – —– revenues, – Ent. 68-71.

  • Rabbits, brought, – Ent. 8.
  • Ragdale, Robert, – Ent. 13, 19, 29 – A tailor.
  • Ragland, – Ent. 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 70 – Her majesty was at Ragland on the 19th and 24th of August, 1502.
  • Ratclif, Mrs. Mary, – Ent. 62 – One of the queen’s gentlewomen.
  • Rauf, John, – 19, 65 – Yeoman of the close car.
  • Rawlenny, —–, wife of, – Ent. 30.
  • Reading, child of grace of, – Ent. 2, 26.
  • Receipts of the queen’s revenue, – Ent. 68-71.
  • Reed, Mr., – Ent. 33.
  • Relick Sunday, – Ent. 17 – The third Sunday after Midsummer-day.
  • Reliques at Westminster, the, – Ent. 30.
  • Reynold, John, – Ent. 48 – —– —– painter, – Ent. 20 – Whether he was the same individual as is mentioned in Ent. #48, is doubtful. See Painting. – —– Walter, – Ent. 64 – Keeper of the garden at Baynard’s Castle.
  • Rhenish wine, brought, – Ent. 27.
  • Ribbands, for, – Ent. 27.
  • Richmond, – Ent. 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 26, 28, 29, 32, 33, 34, 43, 49, 51, 53, 57, 59, 61 – It is manifest that the queen passed great part of her time at Richmond, and that the rest was divided between Greenwich, the Tower, and Westminster, or in visiting places near town. – —– the residence of the queen at, burnt, – Ent. 57.
  • Ricroft, John, – Ent. 63 – One of the queen’s servants.
  • Rivers, Earl, to a person in whose house the earl lodged at the time of his death, – Ent. 47 – Anthony Wydville, Earl Rivers, the queen’s uncle, was beheaded at Pomfret in June 1483, by command of Richard Duke of Gloucester, afterwards Richard the Third; and this entry is another proof of the readiness with which Elizabeth relieved those who had, in however humble a degree, assisted any of her kindred.
  • Robes, for making, – Ent. 22 – —– yeoman of the Queen’s, for his bills, – Ent. 67.
  • Robynet, – Ent. 8, 16, 30, 50, 53 – The queen’s embroiderer. It does not appear whether this was his baptismal or surname. He was boarded and lodged at the queen’s charge.
  • Rochester, Bishop of, – Ent. 28 – Richard Fitz James, the descendant of an ancient Somersetshire family, and uncle of Sir John Fitz James, Chief Justice from 1526 to 1539; he was Bishop of Rochester from the 17th May 1497 to January 1504, when he was translated to Chichester, and thence, in August 1506, to London, and died January 15, 1522.
  • Rockers, to, – Ent. 62, 65 – The situation of rocker to the royal family yet exists. Those mentioned in these accounts were rockers to the queen’s nephews and niece, the children of her sister Lady Katherine Courtenay, and the wages of one were thirty shillings per annum, but the time for which the others were paid is not stated. Mr. Ellis has printed a warrant, which he styles a letter, from Henry the Seventh, to the treasurer and chamberlains of the exchequer, commanding them to pay the arrears of wages due to Lady Darcy, “Lady Masitres,” and “five markes sterlinges unto oure welbeloved Agnes Butler and Emly Hobbes, rockers of our said son, that is to say to every of them, xxxiij s. iiij d. for their wages of the half yere, ended at Easter last passed.” — Original Letters, Second Series, i. p. 170. Whence it seems that their wages were 6 l. 12 s. 8 d each more than those of the rockers of the young Courtentays. The servants in the nursery of the Earl of Northumberland in 1512, consisted of “two rokkers and a childe to attend the nursery.” —Northumberland Household Book, p. 43. In the Regulations ordained by Henry VII., under the “Array of her Majesty’s infants,” it is provided that the child shall “be hadde into the nursery where it shall be nourished with a lady governour to the nursery nurse, with four Chamberers, called Rockers, and the chamberlaine to give them their othes.” – p. 127.
  • Roke, William, of Kidlington, – Ent. 19 – Apparently a wheelwright.
  • Rolf, John, See Rauf.
  • Roper, Henry, – Ent. 6, 11, 20, 22, 23, 26, 28, 32, 42, 43, 61 – Page of the beds. His duties were to go messages, purchase articles, to attend the queen in her progresses and journeys, to prepare for her reception, &c.: his wages were 8 d. a day.
  • Roses for crewel to purfle, – Ent. 50 – See Crewel and Purfle. – —– brought, – Ent. 12.
  • Roundseval, the fraternity of Our Lady of, – Ent. 12 – A cell of St. Mary Ronceval stood on the site of Northumberland House.
  • Russet, gown of, – Ent. 10 – A coarse cloth. In the 37th Edward III., 1363, servants of husbandry and other persons not having goods or chattels worth 40 s., were forbidden to wear any other apparel than what was made of blanket and russet cloths of the value of 12 d. a yard. — Rot. Parl. ii. 279-282. – —– cotton for the queen’s car, – Ent. 66 – Russet is defined to be a reddish brown. Dr. Johnson observes, “Newton seems to use it for grey, but, if the etymology be regarded, improperly.” Palsgrave, however, in 1530, translates, “Russet,” by “Gris,” grey.
  • Rutt, —–, – Ent. 52 – The queen’s shoemaker.

  • Sadlers, to, – Ent. 57.
  • Sadler, Nicholas, – Ent. 66.
  • Saddle, for covering of, – Ent. 10.
  • St. Adrean, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Alban’s, Monastery, of, – Ent. 70 – —– payments to the Anchoresses of St. Peter and St. Michael near, – Ent. 1, 64.
  • St. Amand, Lord, – Ent. 23, 24, 25, 39 – Richard Beauchamp, Lord St. Amand, who succeeded his father in that dignity in 1457, was attainted in 1483, restored in the 1st Hen. VII., and died without legitimate issue in 1508. All these entries relate to bucks sent by him to the queen.
  • St. Anne of the Wood, near Bristol, – Ent. 23 – In the Itinerary of William of Worcester is a notice “De capella St. Annæ per duo miliaria de Bristolliâ,” in the forest of Kingswood. — D.
  • St. Augustine, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Bennett’s, London, parson of, – Ent. 14.
  • St. Clement, the Fraternity of, without Temple Bar, – Ent. 53.
  • St. Dominick, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Edward, of Westminster, offering to, – Ent. 30.
  • St. Francis, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Fredeswide, of Oxford, offerings to, – Ent. 20, 21.
  • St. George, offering to, – Ent. 23.
  • St. Ignasi, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. John, offering to, – Ent. 8.
  • St. Katherine’s Mount, in Sinai, two friars of the monastery of, – Ent. 12.
  • St. Paul’s, offering to, – Ent. 49 – —– the rood of the north door in, and our Lady of Grace, there, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Saviour, offering to, – Ent. 2.
  • St. Sepulchre, London, the fraternity of Corpus Christi, in the parochial church of, – Ent. 5.
  • St. Ursula, brotherhood of, in London, – Ent. 46.
  • Salisbury, Bishop of, – Ent. 56 – Edmund Audley was bishop of Salisbury from 2nd April, 1502 to the 23rd August, 1524, when he died.
  • Sampler, an ell of linen cloth bought for one for the Queen, – Ent. 17.
  • Sand, for, – Ent. 48.
  • Sandys, Sir William, – Ent. 41 – Apparently the first Lord Sandys, a distinguished favourite both with Henry the Seventh and Henry the Eighth.
  • Sarcenets, – Ent. 5, 9, 11, 13, 18, 19, 27, 29- By statute 17th Edward IV., 1477, the wives and unmarried daughters of persons having possessions of the yearly value of 20 l. or upwards, were permitted “to use and were in their colers, ventes, and slefes of their gownes and hukes sateyn chamlet, sarcenet or tarteron.” The wives and unmarried daughters of persons whose possessions yielded 40 s. and upwards per annum, might also use sarcenets and tarterons in this manner. — Rot. Parl. vi. 189.
  • Sarvington, Walter, – Ent. 69 – Reveiver of the queen’s revenues in the counties of Wilts, Berks, and Southampton.
  • Satin, for – Ent. 5, 9, 10, 39, 41 – By statute 3rd and 4th Edward IV., 1463-4, the use of damask and satin was confined to esquires and yeoman of the King’s household; to sergeants, esquires, and gentlemen, having possessions of the yearly value of 40 l.; and to persons of higher rank. – Rot. Parl. v. 504{b}. See also statute 22nd Edward IV., Ibid. vi. 221, and Sarcenet, supra.
  • Savernake, forest of, in Wiltshire, – Ent. 39 – This forest was confirmed in dower to Elizabeth, Queen of Edward IV. – Rot. Parl. v. 627.
  • Saucery, the – Ent. 1 – The Saucery was, it seems, the department in the King’s household which provided the sauces. In the 33rd Henry VI., the officers of the saucery consisted of a sergeant, clerk, yeoman, and groom for the King’s mouth, and of a yeoman and three grooms for the hall. — Regulations of the Royal Household, 4to. 1790, p. *22. In the 17th Henry VIII., in the statutes of Eltham, the duties of the clerk and yeoman of “the pastry and sausery” are defined; the principal of which were to see all their baked meats well seasoned and served, according to the appointment of the clerk of the kitchen, “without embesselling or giveing away any of the same, and also that there be no wasteful expenses made of flower, nor sawse within the said office.” — Ibid. p. 238. See Squillery.
  • Saxilby, Mrs., – Ent. 7 – Probably the Elizabeth Saxby who received 5 l. as part of her salary in the 1st Hen. VIII. — Additional MS. in the British Museum, 7100.
  • Say, Mrs. Ann, – Ent. 19, 21, 25, 27 – One of the queen’s gentlewomen. Her board, whilst ill at Woodstock, cost 1 s. 4 d. a week. A William Say, Esquire, was usher of the chamber to Henry VI. in 1450. — Rot. Parl. v. 191 b.
  • Sayeing, gift to a man “sayeing himself to lodge in his house the Earl Rivers,” – Ent. 47 – “Saying,” in this sense, appears to mean incurring danger or inconvenience; and this person was rewarded for affording shelter to the Earl Rivers, the queen’s uncle, in the time of his distress, and when it was treason to protect him. The word seems to be the same as “assaying,” which, in one sense, imports trial by danger or distress; difficulty, hardship. — Todd’s Johnson. Mr. Gage, however, suggests that “saying” merely meant that this person said he had lodged the Earl Rivers.
  • School hire, for, – Ent. 45, 66 – Eightpence a quarter was the sum paid for the school hire of a young favourite of the Queen’s. See Pallet.
  • Schoolmaster, the Prince’s, – Ent. 16 – See Prince.
  • Scots, the Queen of, – Ent. 6, 11, 13, 17, 19, 21, 53, 54, 57 – Margaret, the queen’s eldest daughter. She was born November 29, 1489, and in 1502, being then fourteen, was affianced to James IV., King of Scotland, and married him in the following year, after whose death at Flodden Field, she remarried in 1514, Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus. On the death of Queen Elizabeth, her great-grandson became King of England in her right.
  • Seal, a brought, – Ent. 1.
  • Searing, candles for the altar clothes, – Ent. 50.
  • Seler of beds and cloths of estate, – Ent. 38 – Palsgrave translates “Sellar of a bedde” ciel, which Cotgrave explains to be “a canopy for the testerns an valances of a bed, also the canopy that is carried over a prince as he walks in state.” Lady Hastings, in 1503, bequeathed to her nephew, “a fedur bedde, a boulster, a blanket, a chike happing, an old counterpoint, sillor and testor.” Among the effects of Sir John Fastolf,temp. Hen. VI., in one of the sleeping apartments were “j purpeynt of white j seloure and j testoure,” on which word the editor of that inventory has remarked, “Seloure or seler is probably the head of the bed. Celura is rendered by Du Cange ‘lecti supremum tegmen, Lat. Cœlum, Gall. Ciel de Lit.'” Archæologia, xxi. 262. That celour or selor also meant a canopy is manifest from the account of the coronation of Henry VIII., in the College of Arms, and printed as part of the evidence of Colonel Berkeley’s claim to the barony of Berkeley. “Canapy to be borne over the King. The Kyng shall ryde opin hedded under a seale of cloth of gold,” &c. p. 219. “The cele or canapi borne over the quene.” — p. 220. “The seale or canapy.” — p. 222.
  • Sergeants at law, – Ent. 63.
  • Severn, for conveying the Queen over the, – Ent. 23.
  • Seymour, Sir John, – Ent. 39, 49 – Father of Protector Somerset, and of Queen Jane Seymour. He was knighted for his services at the battle of Blackheath in 1497; in 1507 was sheriff of Wiltshire; and was made a knight banneret in 1513 for his gallantry at Therounenne and Tournay. He died 21st December, 1536, aged sixty. Collin’s Peerage, ed. 1779, vol. i., p. 143.
  • Shadde, William, – Ent. 6, 29, 37 – Neither of these entries afford any information as to who this person was.
  • Shalmewes, the, – Ent. 56 – Players of the Shalms, i.e. the base cornet. A note with an engraving of a shalm is given in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII, p. 351, and in the Northumberland Household Book, where the following entry occurs: “My Lord useth and accustometh yerly when his Lordship is at home to gyf to iij of the Kyng’s Shames when they com to my Lord yerly, x s.
  • Shanks, fur and tavelyns of, – Ent. 54 – See a note in the index to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Shaw, Sir John, – Ent. 27 – A goldsmith and Mayor of London in 1501. He was the son of John Shaa of Rochford and Essex and was knighted on the field by Henry VII. His name often appears in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII., as having sold the King plate, and as being paid once 4 l. and another time 3 l. 3 s., for a George of the Order of the Garter. He appears to have been one of the executors of Sir Reginald Bray, K.G., in August, 1503.
  • Sheets, for making, – Ent. 13 – —– for various kinds of, – Ent. 49.
  • Shepherd, to a Disar that played the, – Ent. 28 – It has been suggested under “Disar,” that this entry is of a payment to a man who acted the part of the shepheard in some histrionic sense. What the piece was of which the shepherd was the prominent part, cannot perhaps be decidedly ascertained; but it may be conjectured that it was the Adoration of the Shepheards, which was often embroidered on arras and tapestry. In the account of the effects of Sir John Fastolf, under “Clothes of Arras and of Tapstre warke,” is “Imprimis, j clothe of Arras, clyped the Schippherd’s clothe;” and in the “Magna Camera ultra aulam Estevalem, j clothe of Arras of the Schipherds,” which Mr. Douce considers to have been a description [query representation] of the adoration of the Shepherds. — Archæologia, xxi., 257, 262.
  • Shire Thursday, – Ent. 1, 2 – Or Maunday Thursday. See Maunday. The etymology of Shire Thursday is thus explained in the “Festival” printed by Wynkyn de Worde in 1511, f. xxx, p. 2, and f. xxxi.
    “Yf a man aske why Shere Thursday is called so, ye may saye that in Holy Churche it is called (Cena Domini) our Lordes Souper daye; for that day he souped with this Discyples openly; and after souper he gave them his flesshe and his blode to ete and drynke. It is also in Englysshe called Sher Thursdaye, for in olde faders dayes the people wold that daye sher there heedes, and clyppe theyr berdes, and poll theyr heedes, and so make them honest ayenst Ester Day.” A correspondence on the word will be found in Gentleman’s Magazine, vol. xlix.
  • Shirts, for, – Ent. 10, 45, 49, 66.
  • Shoes, for, – Ent. 15, 21, 35, 45, 52, 61, 66.
  • Shrines, various, noticed, – Ent. 2.
  • Shurley, Thomas, – Ent. 3, 13 – Yeoman of the Queen’s Chamber; his wages were 1 s. a day.
  • Sickness, offerings made by the Queen during her, – Ent. 21 – Made to induce the saints to intercede for her recovery.
  • Signet, Office of the, – Ent. 63.
  • Silks, for, – Ent. 3, 11, 15, 30, 39, 45, 57.
  • Sion, Abbess of, – Ent. 8, 55.
  • Skeling, Alice, – Ent. 62 – One of the Queen’s attendants.
  • Skinner, Heyward, – Ent. 63.
  • Sleeves, for making, – Ent. 13, 58 – “Sleeves belonging to coats and gowns were so contrived that they might be either affixed to, or separated from, them, as occasion required; they were commonly made of different materials, and were frequently superbly ornamented. The following articles are selected from an account of Henry VIII., after his decease: ‘A pair of truncke sleeves of redde cloth of gold with cut works, having twelve pair of aglets of gold,” and these sleeves were welted with black velvet. A pair of French sleeves of green velvet richly embroidered with flowers of damask gold, pirl of Morisco work with knops of Venice gold, cordian raised, either sleeve having six small buttons of gold and in every button a pearl and the branches of the flowers set with pearles.’ The sleeves are also said, in some instances, to have had cuffs to them, and in others, to have been ruffed, that is, ornamented with ruffs or ruffles at the hands.” — Strutt’s Dress and Habits, ii. 360, 375.
  • Sleeves belonging to gowns, – Ent. 19 – “Sleeve of a gown or any other garment,” is translated by Palsgrave by the word manche, which is an ancient heraldic bearing. By statute 17 Edward IV., it was ordained that it should be lawful for the wives and unmarried daughters of persons worth 20 l. a year or upwards, to “use and were in their colers, ventes, and slefes of their gownes and hukes sarcenet or tarteron.” — Rot. Parl. vi. 189.
  • Smith, Henry, – Ent. 17 – Clerk of Windsor Castle.
  • Smocks, for, – Ent. 19.
  • Smyth, Richard, yeoman of the Queen’s robes, – Ent. 10, 26, 44, 45, 67 – —– —–, bailiff of Swalowfeld, – Ent. 70 – A William Smith was page of the robes in the 11th Henry VII.
  • Soap, for, – Ent. 45.
  • Socks, for fustian and cloth for making, – Ent. 9, 35, 38 – “Socks for ones foot, chausson” occurs in Palsgrave. A pair for the feet cost 2 d., whilst a pair of hosen came to 10 d. The cloth and making of one pair for the Queen cost 3 s. 6 d.
  • Somerset, revenues of the country of, – Ent. 69.
  • Southwark, the fraternity of St. George in, – Ent. 4.
  • Spain, Lady of, a letter given to, – Ent. 41 – —– to a maid of, that danced before the Queen, – Ent. 55 – —– the Prothonotary of, – Ent. 2.
  • Spaniard, to a, – Ent. 23 – All the persons here mentioned probably came to this country in consequence of Prince Arthur’s marriage to Katherine of Arragon. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII. is an entry of two pounds being given “to a Spaniard that tumbled.”
  • Spangles, for, – Ent. 12 – The entry where this word occurs explains its meaning. See also Spangles in the index to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Spaniels, for their food, – Ent. 58.
  • Spynell, Anthony, – Ent. 35 – A goldmsith, and apparently a foreigner.
  • Squillery, to the, – Ent. 1 – Query, Scullery, the duties of which are sufficiently obvious. In the Household of George, Duke of Clarence, in 1468, were “In the squillery and salserie a yeoman a groom and a page.” It was the duty of the sergeant of the squillery, in the 17th Henry VIII., “to see to his vessels, as well silver as pewter, to be well and truly kept and saved from losses and stealing.” He was also sergeant of the woodyard.
  • Stable, the expenses of the Queen’s, – Ent. 10, 17, 24, 36, 57, 61, 66 – Independently of the two entries where the amount has been obliterated, the whole sum paid for the expenses of the Queen’s stable was 373 l.17 s.