Part XVI.8: Index and Notes for Privy Purse Expenses Stable, to the officers… through Zouch

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  • Stable, to the officers and keepers of the Queen’s, with a buck in reward, – Ent. 21.
  • Stations, – Ent. 4 – “Privileged altars, where, with proper dispositions, indulgences might be obtained from the Holy See. Thus St. Peter’s and the other Basilicks at Rome have privileged altars to which the devotion of individuals frequently leads them, and the visiting of which is often made one of the conditions of obtaining the indulgence of the jubilee; when the faithful are said to make the stations. It appears that the Queen offered at certain places, which were called ‘her stations,’ one of which seems to have been the high altar of Richmond, and others were probably some of the shrines noticed in these accounts. The Queen may have made her stations in fulfillment of some vow, or in satisfaction of a canonical penance. Besides the privileged altars in churches, it must be observed, that it is not uncommon to find standing together in the open air, as in the Coliseum at Rome, on mountains, and in other places, certain privileged altars or oratorios corresponding with the number of the stations of the Passion, a practice of private devotion; and in this sense is to be understood the passage from Chaucer

    ‘Yet I have been at Rome also,
    And gone the statyons all a row.”, — G.

  • Stafford, Lady Elizabeth, – Ent. 22, 48, 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen, who had the comparatively high salary of 33 l. 6 s. 8 d. She was possibly the Queen’s first cousin, namely, the daughter of Henry, Duke of Buckingham, by Katherine, daughter of Earl Rivers. She married Robert Ratcliffe, Lord Fitz Walter and Earl of Sussex.
  • Stafford, Mrs., – Ent. 8, 22 – —- William, – Ent. 7, 8 – Both these persons were servants of the Queen, and were probably husband and wife.
  • Standers, – Ent. 14 – Apparently iron uprights used in building.
  • Standard, key of the great, – Ent. 40 – A large chest used for carrying plate, jewels, or other valuable articles. The word occurs in this sense in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. The clerks of the Earl of Northumberland’s foreign expenses of the works of the kitchin, &c., were allowed at every removal “a gret standert chist for carying of there Bookes.” — Northumberland Household Book,p. 389. Among the effects of Sir Thomas Kyston’s wardrobe, was “one great standard, with locke and keye bound with iron.” — History of Hengrave, p. 34. John Cornwallis, Esq., speaks in his will, in 1506, “of all the brewyng vessells and standards in the brewhouse and bakehouse.” In the last instance the word is used for tresil, stand, or stadle.
  • Staples, for, – Ent. 12, 14.
  • Stars, for, – Ent. 12 – Ornaments for the jackets of persons who were to perform in the “disguising.”
  • Staunton, John, – Ent. 25, 27 – —– —– groom of the Queen’s chamber, – Ent. 20, 23 – —– —– the elder, – Ent. 12, 13, 14, 27, 63 – —– —– the younger, – Ent. 46 – Possibly the son of the previously named. All these entries probably relate to the same person.
  • Stebenhithe, – Ent. 5 – The Duchess of Suffolk, the Queen’s aunt, appears, from this entry, to have resided at Stepney.
  • Stirrups, for, – Ent. 65.
  • Stokeclare, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Stoks, Margaret, – Ent. 50 – An embroiderer.
  • Stole, carriage of the Queen’s, – Ent. 24 – The stole, in this sense, was a kind of packing chest for robes and clothes. “The King’s chamberlain to assign for the ij garderobes and the King’s chambre for the male and stoole, and other stuff needful, to some of xii or xvj sompter horses.” “The Stoole is here kept,” i.e., in the office of the Wardrobe. See the Regulations of the royal household, temp. Henry VII., pp. 40, 41, whence “Grome of the Stole.” – —– sheets for the, – Ent. 49 – “Sheets for the stool” were probably sheets laid to wrap clothes in.
  • Stools, for fetching and making the Queen’s, – Ent. 4, 9 – Four of these stools were “working stooles;” another was covered with scarlet’ and the carriage of one from London to Langley cost 14 s. It seems that they were used for sitting on, rather than for the feet.
  • Stourton, fee farm of, – Ent. 70.
  • Stormy, John, of Chertsey – Ent.10.
  • Straight-white, for five yards of, – Ent. 66 – Cloth called “straights” is frequently mentioned on the rolls of parliament.
  • Strakes, for placing on the close car, – Ent. 19 – “The strakes or streaks of a wheel are the iron plates that shoe the fellows of a wheel or be nailed round the circumference of it.” — Kennett’s Glossary.
  • Stratfeld Mortimer, – Ent. 67 – See Mortimer.
  • Stuff, for conveying, – Ent. 3, 22, 26, 40, 44, 47 – Goods of various kinds.
  • Sudbury, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Suffolk, Duchess of, – Ent. 5, 52, 54 – Elizabeth Plantagenet, second daughter of Richard, Duke of York, and sister of King Edward IV., then widow of John de la Pole, Duke of Suffollk, K.G., who died in 1491. By him she had issue John, who was created Earl of Lincoln, vita patris, and was declared heir to the throne by Richard III, in the event of the death of his own son, and died s. p. 1487, Edmund, who will be again noticed; Humphrey and Edward, priests; Richard, who assumed the title of Duke of Suffolk, was called the “White Rose,” and killed at Pavia in 1525, s. p.; Katherine, who is said to have married William, Lord Stourton, but who is probably confounded with the Katherine Stourton hereafter mentioned; Ann, a nun, at Sion; Dorothy, who died unmarried; and Elizabeth, who married Henry, Lord Morley, and died s. p. Glover notices likewise a son William, who married Katherine, daughter of William, Lord Stourton, and widow of William, Lord Grey. Harl. MSS. 807, p. xi. The duchess is stated, in Frost’s Nortices of Hull, to have died on the 16th November, 16 Henry VII., 1500; but there can be little doubt, from Entry #54, of a buck having been then given her, that she was living in January, 1503. It is evident from these accounts that she was treated with much attention by her niece, the Queen. Though the mother of nine children, her descendents became extinct in the third generation.
  • Suffolk, Duchess of, receipts of her lands, – Ent. 71. – —– Edmond de la Pole, Earl of, – Ent. 3 – Second son of John, Duke of Suffolk, by Elizabeth Plantagenet previously mentioned. His brother John, Earl of Lincoln, dying in 1487, Edmund became heir to his father on his death in 1491; but he was prevented from inheriting the honours of his family in consequence of his brother’s attainder. He was styled, apparently by courtesy only, “Earl of Suffolk;” and from his imprudent temper, frequently inurred the King’s displeasure, to who his birth rendered him an object of jealousy. Having killed a mean person, he was indicted for the crime in 1501, and, though pardoned by Henry, he was placed at the bar of the King’s Bench, and formally arraigned, which so offended his pride, probably because he deemed that he ought ot have been tried by his peers, that he quitted the realm without the King’s leave, and went to his aunt the Duchess of Burgundy. Notwithstanding his conduct, he contirved to make his peace with Henry, and returned to England; but soon after Prince Arthur’s marriage, he went again to Flanders, for which he was solemnly accursed at Paul’s Cross, by a Bull, in October, 1502, and was attainted in 1503. It was on this occasion that his wife was placed under the care of the Duchess of Norfolk. After remaining in exile for some years, he was at length brought to England, and was beheaded on Tower Hill for treason, on the 5th April, 5 Henry VIII., 1513. He married, according to Dugdale, Sandford, and other authorities, Margaret, daughter of Richard Lord Scrope, but she was, in fact, the daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Scrope, second son of Henry Lord Scrope, of Bolton, by Elizabeth, daughter of John Lord Scrope, of Upsal. By her, whose will was proved in May, 1515, he had a daughter, Ann, who took the veil in the Minories about March 1511. Additional MS. in the British Museum, 7100. Sandford’s Genealogical History. Hall’s Chronicle. Rot. Parl. vi. 545. Testamenta Vetusta, p. 530.
  • Sukcads, brought, – Ent. 23 – A kind of sweetmeat. In the account of the feast at the installation of Archbishop Warham in 1466, is “jely ipocras, tench floryshed, lampray pistr’, quince and orange pistr’, tart melior, leche florentine, marmalade succade, comfettes, wafers,” the two last with ipocras. Leland’s Collectanea, vi. 28. Socado, or sucado, which was the same article, is twice mentioned as having been brought to Henry VIII. Privy Purse Expenses, p. 184, 224, once “In reward for bringing ij barells of socado and cakes to the king’s grace:” “In reward for bringing sucado and marmalado to the King’s grace at Eltham.”
  • Surgeon’s bills, – Ent. 8, 41, 66.
  • Surveying the Queen’s land, for, – Ent. 63.
  • Swallowfield park, – Ent. 10, 70 71. – —– the under keeper of, – Ent. 17.

  • Tables, money given to the Queen at, – Ent. 23 – The old name of backgammon. See a note in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII, p. 356.
  • Talbot, Sir Gilbert, – Ent. 37 – Apparently Sir Gilbert Talbot, of Grafton, K.G., ancestor of the Earls of Shrewsbury of that name. He was a privy councillor to Henry VII., from whom he received numerous favours, and whom he served with ability and zeal; and died in September 1516.
  • Tallowing. See Barge.
  • Tame, Edmund, – Ent. 70 – Receiver of the revenue of the Queen’s lands in Gloucestershire and Wilts. “Afterwards Sir Edmund. He was the son of John Tame, an opulent merchant of London, who purchased the manor of Fairford in Gloucestershire, and built there a beautiful church, which still remains in nearly a perfect state, with the finest stained glass in all its windows. Following his father’s example, Sir Edmund Tame built a church at Readcombe, an adjoining village. — See Leland’s Itinerary. D.
  • Tapetts, – Ent. 8 – In this sense, cloths for the sumpter horses; but tapetts also meant tapestry. See Tapets in the Index to Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Tavelyns of Shanks, – Ent. 54 – See Index to the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Tavern, money given, the ministers of the King’s chapel to drink at a, – Ent. 13.
  • Taylor’s bill, – Ent. 22.
  • Temple Bar, – Ent. 53.
  • Thornbury in Gloucestershire, to the church of, – Ent. 23.
  • Thread, for, – Ent. 38, 50, 56.
  • Throckmorton, Christopher, Esq., – Ent. 70.
  • Tippets, sarcenet for the Queen’s, – Ent. 29 – “The tippet appears to have been a part of dress something resembling the partelet, and worn about the neck. It varied in size and form; for it was sometimes large and long like a mantle, at other times, it was narrow and scarcely covered the top of the shoulders. Like the partelet, it was used by men as well as by women.” — Strutt’s Dresses and Habits, ii. p. 368. “The partelet” to which Strutt compares the tippet, “answered the purpose,” he says, “of the gorget which he describes on the authority of John de Reun, a French poet of the thirteenth century, as an article which was wrapped two or three times round the neck, and then fastened with a great quantity of pins, which raised it on either side of the face so as to resemble two horns, whilst it was so closely attached to the chin as to look as if it was nailed to it.” “The partelets,” he continues, “came into fasion towards the fifteenth century, and were common to both sexes. Those belonging to women were made of various stuffs of the most valuable and delicate kind. Sometimes they are described as being without sleeves, whence it may be inferred that they sometimes had them.” “The tippet worn by ladies at the time or mourning, was quite another thing: it was a long narrow stripe of cloth attached to the hood or to the sleeves of the wearer.” Ibid. pp. 167, 368. Tippets were likewise worn round the head.

    “With his tipet ybounde about his hed,
    And she came after in a gite of red.” — Reve’s Tale, l. 3951

    which agrees with the following ordinance which is cited by Strutt, p. 323.
    “Be it remembered that none may weare hoodes, under the degree of an esquire of the King’s household, but only tipets of a quarter of a yard in breadth, except in time of need, and then they may wear hoodes.” Occleve, in his censure on the dress of his times, and of the “foule waste of cloth,” says that a yard of broad cloth was expended in one man’s tippet. — Ibid. p. 254. A part of the costume of a priest was also called a tippet; Palsgrave translates “Typpet for a preest,” by “cornette,” and William Water, vicar of New Church, mentions in his will in 1508, his “velvet tippet.” In De Moleon’s “Voyages Liturgiques,” a canon of St. John’s, of Lyons, is represented habited in his fur tippet. Pl. iv.

  • Tithes, for, – Ent. 14.
  • Tourney, a bed of a, – Ent. 22 – Query, a bed on which was worked the representation of a “tourney” or tournament.
  • Tower, the – Ent. 5, 6, 9, 10, 20, 47, 48, 52, 53, 56, 57, 59, 60, 61 – It appears that the Queen was at the Tower from the 27th April to the 2nd May 1502; that she arrived there on the 12th December in that year, and remained until her accouchement, soon after which she died there.
  • Transoms, for, – Ent. 14.
  • Travice, or Travers, Laurence, – Ent. 36, 47, 62 – This person, whose name is thus variously written, was apparently in attendance on the young Courtenays, the Queen’s nephews and niece.
  • Trende, William, – Ent. 60 – One of the royal servants.
  • Tripe, brought – Ent. 37.
  • Troye, – Ent. 23, 25 – Troy Mitchel, or Mitchel Troy, about three miles south-west of Monmouth, which place the Queen visited during her progress into Wales in September 1503.
  • Trumpeters, coats of white and green sarcenet for the, – Ent. 47 – These dresses, the colours of which, white and green, were the King’s livery, seem to have been made for the trumpeters to wear at the “disguising” in the preceding year.
  • Trussing bed, for the making a, – Ent. 38 – Trussing beds were used in travelling, when it was the custom for persons of consequence to carry their beds with them. Palsgrave translates “Trussyng bedde” by “lit de champ,” i.e., field bed. John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, gave, by his will, dated in February 1397, to his Duchess, “mes lits faites pur mon corps, appelles en Engleterre, trussyng beddes.” Nichols’ Royal Wills, p. 155. In the list of horses kept by the Earl of Northumberland were, “A horsse for my lordes cloth-sak with his bedde,” and “a hors for the grome of the stable to ryde upon that ledes the cloth-sak horsse that caryeth my lords trussynge bed and all thyngs belongynge yt when he rydes his hors.” — Northumberland Household Book, pp. 55, 120, 358, 359. Dr. Percy conjectures that a trussing bed could be trussed or packed in a cloth-sek or portmanteau. “To truss,” means to pack close. A pair of trussing coffers were sent to the King of Scotland in 1430. Fœdera, x. 470; and the same articles, as well as “cotton to trusse plate,” are mentioned in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., pp. 49, 190. In the “Form of Making the King’s Bed,” temp. Henry VIII., to trusse seems to be used synonymously “to tuck in.” “The first sheete to be layed and then to trusse in both sheete and fustyan rounde about the bedde of downe,” “to trusse the endes of the said sheete under every end of the bolster.” — Archæologia, iv., 313. A remarkable instance of the use of the word trussing will be found in the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Twycrosse, Leonard, Ent. 26 – A servant.
  • Tyler, William, desar, – Ent. 53 – See Desar.

  • Usher, the King’s gentleman, – Ent. 56, 57 – John Whiting.
  • Underwood, Dr., – Ent. 33 – The Queen’s Confessor. Probably Edmund Underwood, who resigned the prebendary of Sneating in St. Paul’s before the 28th June, 1518. Bliss’s Wood’s Fusti Oxonienses i. 78.
  • Utton, Dr., – Ent. 51.

  • Valance of a cloth of estate, – Ent. 38.
  • Vandelf, John, – Ent. 38, 54 – A goldsmith.
  • Velvet, for, – Ent. 6, 10, 11, 12, 37, 38, 44 – Velvet appears then to have been from 10 s. to 10 s. 6 d. a yard.
  • Venice, gold and silk of, – Ent. 5 – See Gold.
  • Verney, Sir Ralph, – Ent. 36 – Probably the Sir Ralph Verney who was sheriff of Bedford and Bucks in the third, sixteenth, and thrity-second of Henry VIII., and ancestor of the Earls Verney, &c., in Ireland. – —–, Eleanor, Lady, – Ent. 4, 17, 20, 21, 23, 30, 31, 51, 56, 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen. Her salary was 20 li. per annum. It is probable that this lady was Eleanor, daughter and heir of John Loutham of Northampton, and widow of Sir Richard Verney, of Compton Murdock and Warwick, Knight, who died in 1490, ancestor of the Lords Willoughby de Broke. If this conjecture be correct, she must have been then aged.
  • Venison, brought, – Ent. 24.
  • Venison, carriage of, – Ent. 33.
  • Vysys, two quartered boards with, – Ent. 44 – Apparently, vices or screws. Sir William Bruges, Garter King of Arms, bequeathed by his will in 1449, to the church of St. George, of Stamford, “a tabernacle well ywrought of sylver and over gilt of the wight of one marc or thereabouts goying with a bill to be set high upon the coupe: and above upon the point of the seyd tabernacle, a litel cross of silver and over gilt, goying also by a vyce.
  • Vineyard, the, – Ent. 23 – One of the country seats of the Abbots of Gloucester, one mile distant from that city, near the road which leads to Flaxley in the forest of Dean. — D.

  • Waffry, to the, – Ent. 55 – The Wafry was, and still is, one of the offices of the royal household; an account of it will be found in the Liber Niger Edward IV., printed in the Collection of Regulations of the Royal Household.
  • Wages of the Queen’s servants, – Ent. 62, 63 – On the 13th April, 1503, about two months after the Queen’s death, the following entries occur in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII.
    “For the wages of the Queen’s ladys and gentlewomen, 68 l.
    For the wages of the servants of her staple, 47 l. 12 s. 4 d.
    It appears from the same accounts and those of Henry VIII., that the salaries of some of her ladies continued to be paid long after her decease. – —– of various persons, Ent. 50.
  • Wakefield, Robert, bailiff of Odiham, – Ent. 69.
  • Wales, shoes &c., bought on the Queen’s going into, – Ent. 52 – —– when the Queen returned from, – Ent. 57 – The Queen commenced her progress into Wales in August 1502, and crossed the Severn on her return on the 28th of that month.
  • Walker, John, – 2 – Yeoman Almoner.
  • Waller, John, – Ent. 53 – His servant was rewarded for bringing a goshawk to the Queen.
  • Walsingham, our Lady of, – Ent. 2 – The famous image of the Virgin Mary, which was preserved in the Priory of the Black Canons at Walsingham in Norfolk, was celebrated all over Europe for the great resort to pilgrims, and the rich offerings made to it.
  • Walston, -Ent. 26 – Wollaston, in the hundred of Westbury, in Gloucestershire.
  • Waltier, Lewis, – Ent. 4, 9, 14, 34, 43, 52, 59, – Master of the Queen’s barge. His wages were 16 d. per diem, and to him the wages of the rowers and other expenses of conveying the Queen and her suite by water, and of repairing the barge, &c., were paid. See Barge.
  • Wapping Mill, men hung at, – Ent. 8.
  • Ward, Simon, – Ent. 61 – Lorimer of London.
  • Wardemole, for dyeing, – Ent. 49 – “Wardemole, now called Woadmel, and in Oxfordshire, Wodnenell, a coarse sort of stuff used for the covering of the collars of cart horses. Ray, in this Collection of East and South Country Words, describes it to be a hairy, coarse stuff, made of Island wool, [query, Iceland], and brought thence by our seamen to Norfolk and Suffolk. Perhaps from the Saxon Veoo, grass, hay, weed, and Mele, any hollow continent, as if a collar stuffed with straw or hay; or possibly from the Island Vadur, a rope, or any wod of coarse hemp, and Mel, to beat or mall, ‘Et in quinque virgatis de Waddemole emptis pro coleris equinis hoc anno, ij sol j denar.'” — Kennett’s Glossary. It is evident that Wardemole was a kind of coarse cloth, and in this sense the word is frequently used by Sir Walter Scott in the “Monastery;” and in the supplement to Dr. Jamieson’s Dictionary of the Scottish Language, no other authority is cited for the word, which is there said to mean “a coarse cloth made in the Orkneys,” than that delightful romance.
  • Wardens, brought, – Ent. 3 – Large pears. See a note on this word in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., p. 360.
  • Wardrobe of the Queen’s beds, – Ent. 28, 29.
  • Warreyn, John, – Ent. 38 – A bed maker.
  • Warwick, – Ent. 41.
  • Watch, King’s, to the, – Ent. 55 – The King’s watch consisted, it is presumed, of the twenty-four yeoman of the crown; and it was the duty of the Wait to “pipe the watch” four times during the night, from Michaelmas to Shire Thursday, and in summer three times. Regulations of the Royal Household, temp. Henry VII., pp. 38, 48.
  • Water, for heating, – Ent. 2.
  • Waterman, wages of, – Ent. 4, 9, 14, 34, 43, 58, 60 – See Barge and Waltiers.
  • Wax, for, – Ent. 10, 31, 65 – White wax was 16 d. a pound, being double the price of yellow wax.
  • Wayne, i.e., Wain, paid for bringing one which had broken down, – Ent. 24.
  • Wedding clothes, for the purchase of, – Ent. 3 – —– gown for a, – Ent. 26 – Sixteen shillings were given to an apthocary “towards his wedding gown,” and forty shillings to the page of the Queen’s beds “towards the buying of his wedding clothing.” The custom of presenting favourties and dependants with their wedding clothes was very common, and instances of it will be found in the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV.
  • Weredon, John, Ent. 26 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Westminster, – Ent. 11, 12, 14, 18, 19, 20, 30, 42, 53, 59, 61 – The Queen was at Westminster on the 6th and 12th June, 1502, and apparently rested there for a day before she proceded to the Tower for her last confinement. – —– —– Abbot of, – Ent. 18 – John Islip, who succeeded in 1498, and died 2nd January, 1516. “The rebus of this abbot, a boy slipping from a tree, i.e., I slip, with the initials of his name, occurs in painted glass in the Deanery at Westminster.” — G. – —– —– St. Margaret’s of, – Ent. 61.
  • Weston, Mrs. Anne, – Ent. 13, 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen. – —– —– Richard, – Ent. 51 – A servant of the Queen’s. Probably the father of Sir Francis Weston, K.B., who was supposed to have had an intrigue with Anne Boleyn, and suffered death in consequence.
  • Whiting, John, – Ent. 56, 57 – Gentleman usher of the King’s chamber.
  • Whitestones, Owen, a messenger, – Ent. 63.
  • Wicker bottles, – Ent. 51.
  • Wild boar, a, brought, – Ent. 37.
  • Willesdon, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2, 60.
  • Willeston, Wollaston in Monmouthshire, – Ent. 23, 24 – The Queen was there on the 28th of August, 1503.
  • Williams, Sir John, – Ent. 17 – —– Alice, – Ent. 62 – One of the rockers to the young Lord Edward Courtenay. – —– John, – Ent. 5 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Winchester, Bishop of, – Ent. 56 – Richard Fox, who was translated from Durham 17th October 1500, was Lord Privy Seal, and died 14th September 1528.
  • Windsor, – Ent. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 33, 37, 43, 44, 54 – The Queen was at Windsor in June and early in July, 1502, whence she went to Woodstock; and appears to have stopped there on her return from her progress into Wales.
  • Windsor Park, an arbour made, – Ent. 17 – —– clerk of the castle of, 17 – —– the keeper of the little garden at, – Ent. 4 – —- – to Our Lady, and St. George, and the holy cross at, – Ent. 2, 16 – —– to the children of the college at, – Ent. 18 – —– Richard, then deceased, – Ent. 64 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Wine, Rhenish, brought and purchased, – Ent. 25, 27, 51, 56 – —- – sent for, – Ent. 24 – A note on the wines used in England early in the sixteenth century will be found in the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VIII., p. 363.
  • Wise, Ralph, – Ent. 15 – This person lived at Greenwich, and had the Queen’s fool under his care during his illness.
  • Wolpitts, Our Lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Women, alms to thirty-seven poor in almasse on Shire Thursday, – Ent. 1 – See Maunday.
  • Woodcocks, brought, – Ent. 28.
  • Woodnote, Thomas, – Ent. 16, 18, 21, 23, 33, 34, 53, 54, 61 – Groom of the Queen’s chamber. To him and John Felde, another of the grooms of her Majesty’s chamber, was entrusted the care of her jewels on her removal from one place to another.
  • Woodstock, – Ent. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 44, 70 – Her Majesty was at Woodstock on the 20th July, and was there visited with a fit of illness.
  • Worcester, to Our Lady of, – Ent. 2.
  • Worsted, for, – Ent. 56, 65.
  • Worsted yarn, – Ent. 8.
  • Worthy, William, alias Phip, – Ent. 3, 15, 35 – The Queen’s fool was boarded by him; and for whom he sometimes purchased clothes.
  • Worthy Mortimer, – Ent. 69 – See Mortimer.
  • Wotton, Mrs. Margaret, – Ent. 62 – One of the Queen’s gentlewomen, whose salary was 4 l. per annum.
  • Wurley, Henry, – Ent. 37, 61 – A goldsmith of London.
  • Wyburn, Nicholas, – Ent. 7 – One of the Queen’s servants.
  • Wycombe, – Ent. 20, 22 – In Buckinghamshire, through which the Queen passed, and where she seems to have rested on the 3rd August, 1502.
  • Wyndeslowe, Henry, to the daughters of, – Ent. 12 – On the 2nd of January, 1497, 3 l. 6 s. 8 d were paid by the King for “cristening of Winslow’s child;” one of the daughters of that person here spoken of was probably the King’s god-daughter.
  • Wyrdon, John, – Ent. 17, 66 – One of the Queen’s servants.

  • Yone, Margaret, – Ent. 30 – This person belonged to the Queen’s household.
  • York, minstrels of the Duke of, – Ent. 47 – Henry, the Queen’s second son, afterwards Henry VIII. – —– Archbishop of, Thomas Savage, who was translated from London in April 1501, and died 2nd September, 1507. – —– fool of my Lord of, – Ent. 1 – It is not certan whether the duke or the archbishop of York is here alluded to, probably the former.

  • Zouch, Mrs., 13 – As this entry in which the name of this lady occurs is a payment by the Queen for lining her gown, she was probably one of her Majesty’s attendants, though her name does not occur in the list in Ent. #62.