Part XXII.4: Index and Notes to the Wardrobe Accounts: Katherine, Lady through Parr, Sir William.

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Index and Notes to the Wardrobe Accounts: Katherine, Lady… through Parr, Sir William.

  • Katherine, Lady, her christening: The king’s seventh daughter. This entry fixes the date of her birth about September in 1480. See the Introductory Remarks, and many notices of her in the Privy Purse Expenses of her sister Elizabeth, Queen of Henry VII.
  • Kendale, John: One of the persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Ketiller, Lisbet: A bed-maker.
  • Kent, Earl of: Edmund Grey, fourth Lord Grey of Ruthyn. He was created Earl of Kent in 1465, became Lord High Treasurer, and died in 1488.
  • Keys: See Part XVII, first entry under “Reparacion Maade and Doon in Divers Tenementes…”
  • King, the: Transcriber’s Note. This reference by Nicolas would appear to refer to instances of specific actions of Edward IV, i. e., his departure from the “grete Warderobe; his going to the Grace Dieu; and his specific order for the delivery of 12 yards of scarlet to a particular person or persons, as opposed to the regular mention of the appearance of his signet and sign manual on various warrants cited in these Accounts.
  • Knights of the King’s body: Transcriber’s Note. Specifically, Sir Thomas Montgomery, Sir Thomas Burough, Sir Edward Woodville, and Sir James Radcliff, cited in these Accounts.
  • Kyghley, William: One of the persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.

  • Labourers, expenses of: The price of labour in 1480 was from 4d. to 6d. a day.
  • Laces: Transciber’s Note. Usually of various kinds of ribbon of silk, gold, &c., these were an essential item of clothing used for closing and/or attaching various parts of a costume, and are cited frequently in these Accounts.
     and tassels of books: See Part XVII, reference to Alice Claver in the initial group of entries, and Part XIX, the final entry under “For the Office off the Roobes…”
  • Lamb’s skins: Classified as a fur in these Accounts; see Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe,” and Part XX, entry pertaining to Thomas Hatthe, under “Yiftes Yeven Aswelle…”
  • Langtone, Henry: One of the presons sent to attend on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Latisnails: See Part XVII, fifth entry under “Expenses Necessarie.”
  • Laton: Frequently mentioned throughout these Accounts. See note in the Index and Notes for the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York.
  • Lawn: See Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe” and the note in the Index and Notes for the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York.
  • Leather, of various kinds: See initial entries in Part XVII and Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe.”
  • Leder, Richard: One of the persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Lightfoot, John: Two persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Lime: See Part XVIII, initial entry under “Reparacioon Maade and Doon in Diverse Tenementes…”
  • Linen cloth of various kinds: See Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe.”
  • Livery to divers persons: See Part XXI, entries under “The Somer Clothing of Divers Officers.”
  • Locks of the king’s car, for mending the: See Part XVII, entries under “Reparacion off the Kinges Carre.”
  • Lome: Clay-argille. —Palsgrave.
  • Lowping: See Part XXIX, entries under “For the Office off the Beddes…” Query looping.
  • Lucas, John, of Kent: A person who seized some contraband.
  • Lycour for the king’s car: Liqour for the barehides. In the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York, is an entry of “grease for liquoring barehides.”
  • Lyour, or lyre: Transcriber’s Note. References, of which there are 3 in these Accounts, would all seem to be to a device or devices having to do with the Office of the Beds, but no definition or etymology could be found to explain that connection, other than the following in LYRING OF CURTAINS. It is invariably recorded as “lyour and corde.
  • Lyring of curtains: The word is thus used in the Northumberland Household Book: “Item for the iid groom of the warderobe for the beddis, who is hourely in the warderobe for lyring, sewing, and jouning of stuf.” Ed. 1827, p. 326.
  • Lynches for the king’s car: See Part XVII, entries under “Reparacion off the Kinges Carre.”
  • Lymour, a crupper for the: See Part XVII, entries under “Reparacion off the Kinges Carre.”
    bolt for the king’s car: Ibid.
    saddle, a pair of Lymour hamys: Ibid.

  • Malter, John: A smith.
  • Mantle, a: See initial entries in Part XVII.
  • Mantles, of the Order of the Garter: See Part XVII, first entry under “Expenses Necessarie” and Part XX, 17th entry under “Yiftes Yeven Aswelle…”
  • Marriages, gowns given on: It was a common practice for superiors to present their dependents with gowns on their marriages, and an instance of it occurs in the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York, as well as the reference to that given to George Grey in these Accounts.
  • Massy, John: A tawyer.
  • Medicines, Holland cloth, to make necessary things for the king’s: Probably to serve as bandages, or to be made into lint.
  • Milan harness: See HARNESS.
  • Mille, Edmond: One of the persons appointed to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Misterton, William: Clerk of the Great Wardrobe: his wages were 12d. a-day. On the accession of Henry VII., he obtained a new grant of his situation. In the act of Resumption of the 1st Henry VII., he was protected in the enjoyment “of the office of Clerk of the Great Wardrobe with the wages of 12d. by the day, and liveries for clothing for himself, for winter and summer, and clothing towards the finding of a clerk under him in the saide office by letters patent dated 21 Nov., 1 Henry VII. —Rot. Parl. vi., 344.
  • Montpelier, a merchant of: Transcriber’s Note. Specifically, Piers de Vraulx, according to the second of the initial entries in Part XVII.
    velvet:Transcriber’s Note. Specifically, crimson velvet apparently purchased from the Piers de Vraulx mentioned above.
  • Montgomery, Sir Thomas: Sir Thomas Montgomery was the son of Sir John Montgomery, Knt., by Elizabeth, sister of Ralph Lord Sudley, who also married Sir John Norbury. He was a distinguished person in the reign of Henry VI., and Edward IV., and was honoured with the Order of the Garter for his fidelity and services to the latter monarch. In the 28th Henry VI., by the description of “Thomas Montgomery, the younger, Esquire,” he was protected in the Act of Resumption in the enjoyment of all gifts and grants made to him, “so that our said grauntes exceed not xxiij li. yerly, the which we wol he have and rejoice according to our lettres patentes made unto him, consideryng that he is a younger brother, and hath no thyng to lyve upon, savyng oonly oure gift.” —Rot. Parl. v., 193. In the 1st Edward IV. he was a knight and one of the king’s carvers, with a fee of 40l. a-year. —Ibid., 475. On the accession of Henry VII, he was secured in the possession of the the grants made to him by Edward IV. —Ibid., ci., 359, and died about 1489. On the 28th of July, in that year he made his will, from which it appears that he was twice married, first to Philippa, and secondly to Lady Lora, who was the widow of John Blount, third Lord Mountjoy, but he had no issue. In the Sumptuary Act of the 22nd Edward IV., Montgomery and his friend, Sir Thomas Burgh, whom he constituted as one of his executors, and six or seven other favourites of the king, were specially exempted from its provisions, they being permitted to wear cloth and fur, purple and cloth of gold only excepted. —Rot. Parl., vi., 221.
  • More, John: One of the persons appointed to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Morice, Davy: Two of the persons appointed to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Mustreviliers, cloth of: Apparently cloth made at a place so named in France. The article is thus mentioned in the Paston Letters in the reign of Henry VI. and Edward IV.: –“A fine gown of Must’ de wyller furred with fine beavers, and one pair of brigandines covered with blue velvet and gilt nails, with leg harness: the value of the gown and brigandines 8l.” —Paston Letters. Vol. i., p. 61.
    “My mother sent to my father to London for a gown of “Mustyrddevyllers.” —Ibid, p. 256.

  • Nails, for: See initial entries in Part XVII.
    gilt: Transcriber’s Note.These were most often used on books and are mentioned on brigandines.
    latis: See initial entries in Part XVII.
  • Napkins: See Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe.”
  • Needles: See Part XVIII, final entry under “Reparacion Maade and Doon in Diverse Tenementes…”
  • Nevelle, John: One of the persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Newham, Ralph: Two of the persons sent to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Norton, William: A carpenter.

  • Officers of the king’s wardrobe, summer clothing of seven: See Part XXI, under “The Somer Clothing of Divers Officers.”
  • Oriel, William: A mercer.
  • Ostrich feathers: An ostrich feather cost ten shillings.
  • Ostrich board, cupboards made of: See Part XVIII: Inventories of the “Grete Warderobe.” Wainscot. Kennett’s Parochial Antiquities. The word occurs in the will of William Bruges, Garter King of Arms in 1449. “I ordeyn that the ij chapelles of our Lady and Seynt George wythyn the seyd chirch of Seynt George be closed wyth ostrich boarde, and as the closure of pleyn borde there now conteineth;” and in the Churchwarden’s Accounts of St. Mary Hill, London, “1485, for tymbre and ostrichborde for gynnes and wyndowes;” “1481, A standyng bed made with estrychborde” –“A standyng bed covvey with estricg borde of beyond see makyng.” –Nichol’s Illustrations of Ancient Times, pp. 97, 118. This query is added in a note, “If the same with Eastland borde” in the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward I., p. 119, or borde de Easltand in the Fœdera, iv., 730.” To the word “oster bord,” which also occurs in the Churchwarden’s Accounts of St. Mary Hill, Dr. Pegge has added this note: “Query Easter, from esterych, i.e., wainscot.” —Ibid.,p.263.

  • Parformed: “The valance of the sparver of velvet, white and blue, and parfourmed with white satin.” In this sense, “parformed” seems to mean made up, fitted up, completed. Palsgrave renders “parforme by ‘parfournys’ as well as by je parforme.” It seems in one instance to be used this sense by Chaucer:

    “For threttene is a Covent as I gesse,
    Your confessour herre for his worthinesse,
    Shal parfourme up the noumbre of his Covent.” —Sompter’s Tale, l. 7843.

    See PERFORMING in the Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York.

  • Paillet: Pallets, small beds, so called from their being generally stuffed with straw. The ticks only, which were made of busk, are mentioned in these Accounts:

    “–on a paillet all that glade night,
    By Troilus he laie.” —Troilus and Cressida, book iii., l. 229.

    In the inventory of Sir John Fastolf’s effects, among feather beds, bolsters, materases, quilts, &c., in the chamber of Lady Milicent Fastolf are “ij smalle payletts.” —Archæologia, xxi., p. 269. “The beddes andpayletts in the king’s chamber.” —Liber Niger domus regis Edward IV., p. 22. Certain Officers were to have “russhes and litter for theyre payletts.” —Ibid., p.40.
    “Stuffe for the pallett bedd,” “a mantle for the queene to weare about her in her pallett.” Articles for the Regulation of Henry VIIth’s Household, p. 125, 126. A pallet bed stood near the state or larger bed in the chamber in which the queen was confined. “In the chamber where the queen is to be delivered there must be a royall bedd therein, the flore laid with carpeth over and over, and with a faire pallett bed, with all the stuff belonging thereto, with a rich sperver hanging over,” “a pallett by the bed arrayed according to the bedd, with sheets and paine, except the cloth of gold on the paine to be of another colour than that of the great bedd, and over the pallett a large sparver of crimson satin, &c.” —Ibid., p. 125.

  • Paled: Transcriber’s Note. Frequently used descriptively of fabrics throughout these Accounts. –Paleways, or in perpendicular lines. The word is explained in Todd’s Johnson “striped, from pale in heraldry.”
  • Palfreys: See Part XX, “The Office of the Stable.” Transcriber’s Note. This generally refers to a woman’s saddle horse, and these were given, along with hobys, as a gift to Margaret of Burgundy.
  • Panes: Variegated, composed of small squares, generally applied to counterpanes. It would appear that “Pane” meant any small division, written in the form of a square or a knot. See the references in the Index and Notes to the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York.
  • Paper: See Part XVIII, final entry under “Reparacion Maade and Doon in Diverse Tenementes…” —black: Part XVII, 7th entry under “Yit Expenses Necessarie.”
  • Paris and Elyn, story of, worked on arras: The inventory of the effects of Henry V., on the Rolls of Parliament, iv., 230, et seq., present an idea of the various subjects which were represented on arras and tapestry in the fifteenth century. See COSTERS.
  • Parker — of Dover; –Willliam: Two of the persons appointed to wait on the Duchess of Burgundy.
  • Parr, Sir William: Son and heir of Sir John Parr. He was born in 1434, and having distinguished himself n the service of Edward IV., particuarly at Barnet field, he was made a knight banneret, honoured with the Garter, and was comptroller of the king’s household at that monarch’s decease, whose funeral he attended. Sir William married Elizabeth, daughter of Lord Fitz Hugh, by whom he was father of Sir Thomas, and of William Baron Parr of Horton. Sir Thomas, the eldest son, was father of Queen Katherine Parr, and of William, Earl of Essex and Northampton.