The Search for Richard’s Remains

‘To those around the world who saved the Greyfriars dig from disaster and cancellation, you gave us our mandate when you said: ‘Search for him, find him, honour him’. It is now time to fulfil this mandate and honour this much maligned monarch with a reburial that befits a king, and a total reassessment of his life and times…’ Philippa Langley Feb 2013.

Philippa Langley

Philippa Langley

In August 2012, the University of Leicester in collaboration with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted: no less than a search for the lost grave of King Richard III.

The last English king to die in battle, Richard had been buried five centuries earlier with little pomp in the church of the Grey Friars, all physical trace of which had long since been lost.

Incredibly, the excavation uncovered not only the friary – preserved underneath a council car park – but also a battle-scarred skeleton with spinal curvature. On 4th February 2013, after a battery of scientific tests, the University announced to the world’s press that these were the remains of Richard III. England’s last Plantagenet monarch had been found. Read about the background to the search, the discovery and identification of the remains – and the implications for our understanding of history…

For full information on the entire project, including:

 

Greyfriars Warrior

Greyfriars Warrior

Richard III Skeleton

Richard III Skeleton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The results of the project were filmed by Channel 4 & is now available for viewing here & for a timeline of events click here.

Please also note that the research behind the search project is now available in booklet format: Finding Richard III: The Official Account.

#Finding Richard III Cover 3.04 MB

#Finding Richard III Cover 3.04 MB

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